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Simeon Solomon
NIGHT LOOKING UPON SLEEP HER BELOVED CHILD (I)
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17
Simeon Solomon
NIGHT LOOKING UPON SLEEP HER BELOVED CHILD (I)
前往

拍品詳情

維多利亞時期、拉斐爾前派與英國印象派藝術

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倫敦

Simeon Solomon
1840-1905
NIGHT LOOKING UPON SLEEP HER BELOVED CHILD (I)
signed and dated l.r.: SIMEON/ SOLOMON/ 1895
watercolour and charcoal on paper
31 by 41cm., 12 by 16in.
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來源

Purchased in August 1919 for The Ben Uri Gallery with the assistance of Moshe Oved

展覽

Ben Uri Art Gallery, London, Opening Exhibition, 1944, no.140 as 'Night and Dream';
Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, Munich, Museum Villa Stuck, and The London Jewish Museum of Art, Love Revealed - Simeon Solomon and the Pre-Raphaelites, 2006, no.136;
Osborne Samuel, London, Apocalypse: Unveiling a Lost Masterpiece by Marc Chagall plus 50 Selected Master Works from the Ben Uri Collection, 2010;
Somerset House, London, Out of Chaos: Ben Uri - 100 Years in London, 2015

相關資料

'Again I raised my eyes, and saw her who had lately been revealed to us receiving the passing breath of Day; with unrelaxing gaze, and eyes from whose depths comes forth all gentleness, she watched Sleep, her beloved son; and she, to whom all was an open scroll, wept when she looked upon him whose heart was as the heart of a child.'
‘A Vision of Love Revealed in Sleep' prose poem by Simeon Solomon

Of all the images that Solomon produced, his Symbolist depictions of Night and her child Sleep, was arguably the most powerful. Nyx, the Greek Goddess of Night, is usually depicted as a hooded maternal figure against a starry sky, accompanied by a youth with closed eyes who can be identified as her son Hypnos God of Sleep, fathered by Erebus the God of Darkness. In Solomon’s drawings he usually placed poppies (symbols of sleep due to their opiate powers) in the hair of Hypnos beside wings on his temples (symbolising the flight of time) which was probably derived from classical sculpture such as the famous bronze at the British Museum. There is a sensual languor to the imagery of the two androgynous heads facing each other, one conscious and perceptive and other in slumber which was perhaps a composition inspired by The Sleepers and the One who Watcheth of 1870 (Leamington Spa Art Gallery and Museum). A lost drawing of 1872 entitled Night and Sleep is known from a photograph and was probably the most elaborate of the various versions; another of the same title is dated 1888 (Birmingham City Art Gallery) and The Moon and Sleep of 1894 (Tate) may also be included in the group of related pictures.

維多利亞時期、拉斐爾前派與英國印象派藝術

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倫敦