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152

THE PROPERTY OF A LADY

English School, circa 1610
PORTRAIT OF LADY MARY SACKVILLE, THREE-QUARTER-LENGTH, HOLDING A FAN AND A STEM OF HONEYSUCKLE, SEATED BEFORE A RED CURTAIN
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152

THE PROPERTY OF A LADY

English School, circa 1610
PORTRAIT OF LADY MARY SACKVILLE, THREE-QUARTER-LENGTH, HOLDING A FAN AND A STEM OF HONEYSUCKLE, SEATED BEFORE A RED CURTAIN
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拍品詳情

西洋古典油畫日拍

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English School, circa 1610
PORTRAIT OF LADY MARY SACKVILLE, THREE-QUARTER-LENGTH, HOLDING A FAN AND A STEM OF HONEYSUCKLE, SEATED BEFORE A RED CURTAIN
inscribed on the reverse: The Lady Mary Sackfield / Daughter to the Earl of Dorsett / Lord High Treasurer of England / and Wife to the Lord of Abergavenny / Great-Grand-Mother to the Lord Coningseby [sic.]
oil on oak panel, unframed, with extensions to the left, right and upper margins
124.6 x 102 cm.; 49 1/8  x 40 1/8  in.
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來源

Presumably by descent from the sitter to her great-grandson
Thomas Coningsby, 1st Earl of Coningsby (1656–1729), Hampton Court, Herefordshire;
Thence by descent to George Capel-Coningsby, 5th Earl of Essex and Viscount Malden (1757–1839), Hampton Court, Herefordsire, by 1784 (listed in Musgrave MS. 6391, 70v., no. 16);
Probably John Arkwright, who bought Hampton Court in 1809;
Mrs. Jeremy Hutchinson;
By whom sold, London, Sotheby's, 15 March 1972, lot 190 (as Gheeraedts), to the husband of the present owner.

相關資料

Lady Mary Sackville (1584–circa 1613) was the daughter of Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset (1536–1608) and Cecily Barker. She married Henry Neville, 7th Lord Abergavenny (circa 1579–1641) before 1601, and with him had five children.

In this portrait Lady Mary is depicted wearing fashionable Jacobean accessories – the black strings looped and tied in knots, from which dangle hoops, possibly carved from carnelian stone. Her white neck is also emphasised by the black string of her necklace, the pendant of which is hidden but may possibly have been formed of a stone believed to have protective and healing properties and thus kept close to the skin. Her bracelet is probably made of coral beads (perhaps alternated with pearls), also thought to be amuletic. Lady Mary's dress is embroidered with silver thread, which could be interpreted as caduceus forms: snakes coiled around rods, emblematic of eloquence and love of literature. The honeysuckle she holds signifies love and devoted affection.

It is interesting to note that the inscription on the reverse of the portrait identifies this as the likeness recorded at Hampton Court, Herefordshire, due to its mention of the sitter's relationship to Lord Coningsby.

西洋古典油畫日拍

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