196
196
Joseph Mallord William Turner, R.A.
BATTLE ABBEY, SUSSEX
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196
Joseph Mallord William Turner, R.A.
BATTLE ABBEY, SUSSEX
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拍品詳情

西洋古典油畫及素描

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倫敦

Joseph Mallord William Turner, R.A.
1775 - 1851年,倫敦
BATTLE ABBEY, SUSSEX
Watercolour over pencil, heightened with bodycolour, scratching out and stopping out
382 by 560 mm
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來源

Commissioned by John Fuller (1757-1834), Rosehill Park, Brightling,
by family descent until,
Sir Alexander Fuller-Acland-Hood, 1st Baron St Audries (1853-1917),
his sale, London, Christie's, 4 April 1908, lot 90, bt. Agnew's, on behalf of the father-in-law of the present owner

 

展覽

London, The International Exhibition, 1862;
Hastings, Hastings Museum and Art Gallery, Turner in 1066 Country, 1998, no. 9;
London, Royal Academy, Turner - The Great Watercolours, 2000/2001, no. 24;
The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford (on loan 2004-2018)

出版

Sir W. Armstrong, Turner, London 1902, p. 41;
A. Wilton, The Life and Work of J.M.W. Turner, Fribourg 1979, p.349, no. 435;
E. Shanes, Turner's England 1810-1838, London 1990, p. 25;
A. Loukes, Turner's Sussex, exhib. cat., Sussex, Petworth House, 2013, p. 6  

Engraved:

by J.C. Stadler, privately printed for Four Large Coloured Views in Sussex, 1818

相關資料

In this watercolour, which dates to 1810, Turner depicts a landscape of seminal importance in British history: the site of the battle of Hastings. In the middle distance, surrounded by beautiful Sussex countryside stands Battle Abbey, which was built upon the command of William the Conqueror, to celebrate his victory in 1066. In the foreground, positioned on a rural path, whose wayside is lined with foxgloves, yarrows and other wild flowers, two boys hurl rocks at a large snake.

Much has been written about this celebrated watercolour and Turner’s subtle references to the events of 1066. The boys are seen to represent the English army, while the snake has been interpreted as not only the invading Norman forces, but also the deadly arrow that pierced King Harold Godwinson’s right eye. Furthermore, Turner’s inclusion of the two rabbit holes, one of which is clearly the serpent’s destination, have been read as King Harold’s eyes, while the flat surface of the felled tree trunk to the right, would again appear to reference his famous death and the fall of the Anglo-Saxon world.

For further information on the history of this watercolour, please see lot 193.

西洋古典油畫及素描

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倫敦