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Pablo Picasso
FAMILLE, TÊTES LAURÉES: QUATRE PERSONNAGES
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304
Pablo Picasso
FAMILLE, TÊTES LAURÉES: QUATRE PERSONNAGES
前往

拍品詳情

印象派及現代藝術日拍

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Pablo Picasso
1881 - 1973年
FAMILLE, TÊTES LAURÉES: QUATRE PERSONNAGES
Dated 8.8.56. (upper left)
Nine painted and glazed ceramic tiles
Overall: 12 1/8 by 12 1/8 in.
30.8 by 30.8 cm
Executed on August 8, 1956; this work is unique.
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Claude Picasso has confirmed the authenticity of this work.

來源

Estate of the artist
Jacqueline Roque, Mougins (acquired from the above)
Howard Russeck Gallery, Palm Beach
Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2007

展覽

Paris, Galerie Etienne Sassi, Picasso: Hommage à Jacqueline, 1990
Vallauris, Musée Magnelli—Musée de la Céramique, Picasso: Céramiste à Vallauris: pièces uniques, 2004, no. 31, illustrated in the catalogue
Seto, Aichi Prefectural Ceramic Museum, Picasso: Cerámica et traditión, 2005, no. 105, illustrated in the catalogue

相關資料

As Brassaï said of Picasso, “I am struck by his infallible gift to give life to any material that he touches. From the first stroke, he guesses, invents, and reinvents the most fitting technique, as if the sources, secrets, manual skills, age-old experiences of all the graphic and plastic trades were instantaneously at his disposal” (Brassaï, Conversations with Picasso, Chicago, 2003, p. 176).

Although most of his ceramics were produced in Vallauris, the present work was conceived in 1956 when Picasso moved to Cannes, where he made his home in a villa called La Californie and shot his famous film Le Mystère Picasso. According to art historians, Picasso had clay delivered to his home and would later return it, molded and decorated, to a kiln for firing. While most of Picasso’s ceramics were editioned, the present work Famille, Têtes Laurées: quartre personnages is unique. The hand-painted composition is pieced together with nine square tiles, depicting four family members in a fluid and simplified yet playful style that is instantly recognizable as that of Picasso. An interesting aspect of note is the combination of two opposing media at play: while ceramic is inherently a three-dimensional medium, the image itself is painted on the surface in two dimensions, making this piece as much a graphic work as it is a sculpture. Picasso thus combines volume and surface and transforms the object beyond image into concept. He references this effect in his own words: “It would have sufficed to cut these paintings up…and then assemble them according to the indications given by the color, to find oneself before a ‘sculpture’” (quoted in Roland Penrose, The Life and Work of Picasso, Los Angeles, 1981, p. 265).

印象派及現代藝術日拍

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