264
264

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE COLLECTION, CANADA

Marino Marini
GUENDALINA
估價
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Lots with this symbol indicate that a party has provided Sotheby’s with an irrevocable bid on the lot that will be executed during the sale at a value that ensures that the lot will sell. The irrevocable bidder, who may bid in excess of the irrevocable bid, will be compensated based on the final hammer price in the event he or she is not the successful bidder or may receive a fixed fee in the event he or she is the successful bidder. If the irrevocable bidder is the successful bidder, the fixed fee (if applicable) for providing the irrevocable bid may be netted against the irrevocable bidder’s obligation to pay the full purchase price for the lot and the purchase price reported for the lot shall be net of such fixed fee. If the irrevocable bid is not secured until after the printing of the auction catalogue, a pre-lot announcement will be made indicating that there is an irrevocable bid on the lot. If the irrevocable bidder is advising anyone with respect to the lot, Sotheby’s requires the irrevocable bidder to disclose his or her financial interest in the lot. If an agent is advising you or bidding on your behalf with respect to a lot identified as being subject to an irrevocable bid, you should request that the agent disclose whether or not he or she has a financial interest in the lot.
Guaranteed Property
Guaranteed Property. The seller of lots with this symbol has been guaranteed a minimum price from one auction or a series of auctions. If every lot in a catalogue is guaranteed, the Conditions of Sale will so state and this symbol will not be used for each lot.
250,000350,000
拍品已售 187,500 美元 成交價 (含買家佣金)
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264

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE COLLECTION, CANADA

Marino Marini
GUENDALINA
估價
Irrevocable Bids
Lots with this symbol indicate that a party has provided Sotheby’s with an irrevocable bid on the lot that will be executed during the sale at a value that ensures that the lot will sell. The irrevocable bidder, who may bid in excess of the irrevocable bid, will be compensated based on the final hammer price in the event he or she is not the successful bidder or may receive a fixed fee in the event he or she is the successful bidder. If the irrevocable bidder is the successful bidder, the fixed fee (if applicable) for providing the irrevocable bid may be netted against the irrevocable bidder’s obligation to pay the full purchase price for the lot and the purchase price reported for the lot shall be net of such fixed fee. If the irrevocable bid is not secured until after the printing of the auction catalogue, a pre-lot announcement will be made indicating that there is an irrevocable bid on the lot. If the irrevocable bidder is advising anyone with respect to the lot, Sotheby’s requires the irrevocable bidder to disclose his or her financial interest in the lot. If an agent is advising you or bidding on your behalf with respect to a lot identified as being subject to an irrevocable bid, you should request that the agent disclose whether or not he or she has a financial interest in the lot.
Guaranteed Property
Guaranteed Property. The seller of lots with this symbol has been guaranteed a minimum price from one auction or a series of auctions. If every lot in a catalogue is guaranteed, the Conditions of Sale will so state and this symbol will not be used for each lot.
250,000350,000
拍品已售 187,500 美元 成交價 (含買家佣金)
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拍品詳情

印象派及現代藝術日拍

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紐約

Marino Marini
1901 - 1980年
GUENDALINA
Signed Marino (upper left); signed twice Marino, dated 1932 and titled (on the reverse)
Oil on board mounted on board
62 1/2 by 37 1/2 in.
158.75 by 95.2 cm
Painted in 1932.
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The authenticity of this work has been confirmed by the Fondazione Marino Marini.

來源

Dominion Gallery, Montreal (acquired directly from the artist)
Acquired from the above on April 3, 1969

展覽

Toronto, Instituto Italiano di Cultura, Marino Marini: Sculptures, Paintings and Drawings, 1998, n.n.

出版

Marina Marini, Marino Marini: Diario Fotografico Raccontato da Marina, Turin, 1972, illustrated p. 124

相關資料

A staunchly didactic artist, Marini sought to reconcile his intensive study of the past with the modern aesthetic of his day. Abraham Marie Hammacher discusses the nature of this duality: “His task became this: to take the two heterogeneous elements of history, the tradition that molded him in his youth and the life of his own age and, by involving them both in the very essence of his being, to restore them to a single root” (Abraham Marie Hammacher, Marino Marini: Sculpture, Painting and Drawing, London, 1971, p. 12).

The bands of harlequins, saltimbanques and actors of the Commedia dell’Arte and related productions of the nineteenth century are one of the most prominent examples of this synthesis. Scenes from the Commedia dell'Arte had been perennial favorites of European artists since the mid-1500s, and had readily been utilized by artists including Antoine Watteau, Georges Seurat and Pablo Picasso. “Owing to his background as a painter and draftsman, Marini was still under the spell of motifs from the world of the performing arts—the borderland of society—which appeared in painting at the end of the nineteenth century and continued through Picasso’s Blue and Rose periods and which were brought to life again by Calder in 1928 in his wire-figure circus. In Marini’s sculptures the play motifs were removed from the sphere of action and brought to rest and immobility” (ibid., p. 17; see fig. 1)

The present work takes one of these peripheral figures as its subject, modernizing her in the vibrant colors of Marini’s day and demonstrating the artist’s extraordinary facility in manipulating color and painterly form. Fascinated by the richness of oil painting and the freedom it gave him, the artist himself commented: “Painting is a vision of color. Painting means entertaining the poetry of fact; and in the process of its making the fact becomes true. In color, I looked for the beginning of each new idea. Whether one should call it painting or drawing, I do not know" (quoted in Sam Hunter, Marino Marini, The Sculpture, New York, 1993, p. 37). The satisfaction the artist found in painting is evident in the present work in the overlapping layers of pigment, resulting in visual depth and a rich surface texture.

Fig. 1 Pablo Picasso, L’Acteur, 1904-05, oil on canvas, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

印象派及現代藝術日拍

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紐約