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L'ART DE VIVRE: PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF KATHLEEN AND MARTIN FIELD

Henri le Sidaner
LE VIEUX FAUNE
前往
164

L'ART DE VIVRE: PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF KATHLEEN AND MARTIN FIELD

Henri le Sidaner
LE VIEUX FAUNE
前往

拍品詳情

印象派及現代藝術日拍

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紐約

Henri le Sidaner
1862 - 1939
LE VIEUX FAUNE
Signed LeSidaner (lower left)
Oil on canvas
28 3/4 by 36 1/4 in.
73 by 92 cm
Painted in Versailles in 1926.
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來源

Galeries Georges Petit, Paris
Géo H. Davey, Paris
La Chêvre du Tibet, Paris & Geneva
Acquired from the above in 1987

展覽

Paris, Galeries Georges Petit, Exposition Le Sidaner, 1927, no. 26
Paris, Palais Galliera, Retrospective, 1998, no. 53

出版

Le Gaulois artistique, November 13, 1927, n.p.
Camille Mauclair, Henri Le Sidaner, Paris, 1928, p. 171
Yann Farinaux-Le Sidaner, Le Sidaner, L'Oeuvre peint et gravé, Paris, 1989, no. 585, illustrated p. 219

相關資料

Le Vieux faune represents Le Sidaner’s mature style, featuring elements from the several movements which characterized the arc of his career. This work likely references the grounds surrounding Le Sidaner’s cottage in the fortress town of Gerberoy, which he purchased in 1904.

The modernizing influences can be seen in the vibrant color spectrum of this fall scene, particularly in the waters of the pond. The cool hues of the water stand in stark contrast to the yellows and oranges of the turning leaves. A Greco-Roman inspired sculpture of a faune in a meditative stance inhabits the foreground. This figure imbues Le Vieux faune with a sense of mystery, harkening to Le Sidaner’s Symbolist origins. Until this point in his career, the artist avoided all human presence in his work, as he “feared that [it] might disturb their muffled silence” (Camille Mauclair, op. cit., Paris, 1928, p. 31). The presence of the faune, therefore, makes this a rare example in the artist's oeuvre.

Le Sidaner's desire to escape from the urban bustle of Paris is well-documented. His choice to incorporate a classical figure in this idyllic natural scene exemplifies his yearning for a simpler time. The reflection of the foliage upon the pond just beyond the figure brings to mind Le Sidaner’s Impressionist peers, who were masters at capturing the effects of light on water. Indeed, Monet’s Giverny gardens were also north of Paris, not too distant from Le Sidaner’s home in Gerberoy. As Paul Signac stated, "Le Sidaner's entire work is influenced by a taste for tender, soft and silent atmospheres" (quoted in Yann Farinaux-Le Sidaner, op. cit., p. 31). While the sculpture in the work appears voluminous, Le Sidaner paints the rest of the scene with Divisionist brushwork. In this manner, the work is ephemeral, the specific time and place fleeting.

印象派及現代藝術日拍

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