126
126

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF BARBARA & MARTIN ZWEIG

Eva Gonzalès
ROSES DANS UN VERRE
前往
126

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF BARBARA & MARTIN ZWEIG

Eva Gonzalès
ROSES DANS UN VERRE
前往

拍品詳情

印象派及現代藝術日拍

|
紐約

Eva Gonzalès
1849 - 1883年
ROSES DANS UN VERRE
Stamped Eva Gonzalès (lower right)
Oil on canvas
16 5/8 by 16 5/8 in.
42.3 by 42.3 cm
Painted circa 1880-82.
參閱狀況報告 參閱狀況報告

來源

Larry Ostrom, Ontario, Canada
Galerie Daber SA, Paris (and sold: Sotheby's, London, December 7, 1978, lot 512)
Josefowitz Collection, Switzerland (acquired at the above sale and sold: Christie's, New York, May 7, 2002, lot 11)
Acquired at the above sale

展覽

Toronto, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1979 (on loan)
Aichi, Prefectural Museum of Art; Tokyo, Takashimaya Art Gallery; Osaka, Takashimaya Art Gallery; Utsunomiya, Tochigi Prefectural Museum of Fine Arts & Kumamoto, Prefectural Museum of Art, Six femmes-peintres, 1983, no. 34, illustrated in the catalogue

出版

Marie-Caroline Sainsaulieu & Jacques de Mons, Eva Gonzalès, 1849-1883, Étude critique et catalogue raisonné, Paris, 1990, no. 113, illustrated in color p. 245

相關資料

Eva Gonzalès was born in Paris in 1849, where at the age of sixteen, she began taking art courses at Charles Chapin’s studio. Gonzalès met Édouard Manet in this studio in 1869, and he quickly became Gonzalès' teacher and mentor. As his sole pupil, Gonzalès achieved considerable success within Parisian art circles during her lifetime. While much of her work drew inspiration from the style and techniques learned under Manet’s tutelage, Gonzalès was confined in her choice of subject matter due to her gender and its societal repercussions. Nonetheless, her beautiful bouquets, portraits of her closest family members and self portraits achieved a warm elegance previously unknown in the Impressionist mode, cementing her as a pivotal, if under-appreciated figure in the movement.

Her lamentable popular obscurity is attributable in no small part to her untimely death. Gonzalès died during childbirth in 1883, just a few days after the death of Manet. Unwilling to exhibit with the Impressionists, she stayed the course in the salons with her maître and achieved significant critical acclaim despite her lack of popularity in the eyes of the public. The continued rediscovery of Gonzalès's skillful hand places her in the pantheon of female Impressionists alongside Berthe Morisot and Mary Cassatt, while the quality of her work links her to many more masters of the era.

Manet was undeniably the single greatest influence on Gonzalès' artistic style. The present work, with its gloriously staccato-like brushwork and closely cropped composition, is not without affinity to his celebrated late still lifes which were painted concurrently (see fig. 1). Gonzalès was championed by the likes of Émile Zola, who referred to her as the "naturalist artist of our times" (quoted in “Lettres Parisiennes” in La Cloche, May 12, 1872, p. 2, translated from the French), and the critic Jules Clarétie, who wrote of Gonzalès as "an artist of rare talent, who takes the brush after having handled pastel like Rosalba" (Jules Clarétie, Peintres et Sculpteurs Contemporains, Paris, 1874, p. 263, translated from the French).

印象派及現代藝術日拍

|
紐約