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Babylonian Talmud, Tractates Me‘ilah, Kinnim, Middot, and Tamid, Venice: Daniel Bomberg, 1528-[1549]
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Babylonian Talmud, Tractates Me‘ilah, Kinnim, Middot, and Tamid, Venice: Daniel Bomberg, 1528-[1549]
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Babylonian Talmud, Tractates Me‘ilah, Kinnim, Middot, and Tamid, Venice: Daniel Bomberg, 1528-[1549]
47 folios (14 x 9 1/8 in.; 356 x 230 mm) (collation: i-v8, vi7) on paper; modern foliation in pencil in Arabic numerals in lower-outer corner of recto (1-37, 1-10). Four woodcut foliate frames at the start of each of tractate (ff. 2r, 22v, 25v, [34r]); tapering text on ff. 18r, 20r, 21r, 22r, 25r, 26r-27r, 28v, 29v-30r, 32r-v, 33v, 37v, 39v-40r; manuscript note in Yiddish on f. [1r]; manuscript references, corrections, and/or highlights on virtually every page of ff. 2-37; illegible owner’s stamp on f. 47v. Slight scattered staining; small repairs in gutters almost throughout; minor worming on ff. 1-37 repaired (except on f. 10), usually affecting only individual letters; f. [1] mounted on guards; short tear in upper edge of f. 10 repaired; light damage in upper-outer corners of ff. 25-37 repaired; textblocks of ff. 38-47 supplied and mounted on modern paper, with slight loss of text; two small wormholes at center of ff. 38-47 affecting only individual letters. Modern deep green leather paneled in blind; spine in six compartments with raised bands; title and place of printing lettered in blind on spine; modern paper flyleaves and pastedowns.
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相關資料

This volume contains the final four tractates in the order Kodoshim: Me‘ilah (ff. 2a-22a) and Tamid (ff. 25b-33b) with Talmudic commentary, Kinnim (ff. 22b-25a) and Middot (ff. [34a]-37b) without. Me‘ilah (Trespass) deals, in six chapters, with the unlawful use and enjoyment of hekdesh (items, especially sacrifices, consecrated to the Temple). Kinnim (Nests) discusses, in three chapters, the consequences of confusing the ownership and/or sacrificial identity (burnt offering vs. sin offering) of pairs of birds meant to be offered in the Temple. Middot (Measures) gives, in five chapters, exact details and measurements of the Second Temple’s component structures as renovated by Herod the Great (73-4 BCE), perhaps in order to serve as a blueprint for the future rebuilding of the Temple in the messianic era. Tamid, an abbreviated form of Olat ha-tamid (The Daily Burnt Offering), treats, in seven chapters, the daily ritual routine of the priests in the Temple, from the moment they began their service early in the morning with the removal of the Altar’s ashes until after the morning’s olat ha-tamid had been sacrificed. 

Appended to the end are three of the fourteen “minor,” non-canonical tractates of the Talmud: Semahot (also known as Evel rabbati; ff. 38a-41a) on the laws of burial and mourning; Kallah (f. 41b) on the subjects of betrothal, marriage, chastity, and moral purity; and Soferim (ff. 43b-47a) on scribal practice when copying Torah scrolls, tefillin, and mezuzot, as well as various liturgical matters. Piskei tosafot to tractates Temurah, Tamid, Kereitot, Kinnim, and Middot are also included (ff. 42a-43a). Cornelio Adelkind’s famous colophon describing the genesis and nature of the Bomberg Talmud project closes the volume on f. 47b.

Me‘ilah and part of Tamid, like NedarimNazirTemurah, and Kereitot, are two of the “special tractates” written in a peculiar dialect of Aramaic that seem not to have benefited from final editorial polishing.

A note on collation: Scholars have shown that Bomberg’s press occasionally backdated volumes from his third edition (1543-1549) by “forging” the title page to look like an authentic first- (1519/20-1523) or second- (1526-1539) edition imprint. Such is the case with part of the present volume, whose first thirty-seven leaves, through the end of Middot, come from the third edition but whose title page bears the misleading date [5]288 (1528). By contrast, the final ten folios, supplied from another copy, are genuine second-edition leaves, as evidenced by the lack of dotted i’s in the signature line, the date Tevet [5]289 (December 1528-January 1529) in the colophon (f. 47v), and the use of the Hebrew name Karniel (as opposed to the Christianized form Cornelio) on the same page.

Literature

A.M. Habermann, Ha-madpis daniyyel bombirgi u-reshimat sifrei beit defuso (Safed: The Museum of Printing Art, 1978), 63 (nos. 118/119).

Vinograd, Venice 127

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