11
11
Hurvin Anderson
MARLENE'S
估價
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300,000400,000
拍品已售 394,000 英鎊 成交價 (含買家佣金)
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11
Hurvin Anderson
MARLENE'S
估價
Irrevocable Bids
Lots with this symbol indicate that a party has provided Sotheby’s with an irrevocable bid on the lot that will be executed during the sale at a value that ensures that the lot will sell. The irrevocable bidder, who may bid in excess of the irrevocable bid, will be compensated based on the final hammer price in the event he or she is not the successful bidder or may receive a fixed fee in the event he or she is the successful bidder. If the irrevocable bidder is the successful bidder, the fixed fee (if applicable) for providing the irrevocable bid may be netted against the irrevocable bidder’s obligation to pay the full purchase price for the lot and the purchase price reported for the lot shall be net of such fixed fee. If the irrevocable bid is not secured until after the printing of the auction catalogue, a pre-lot announcement will be made indicating that there is an irrevocable bid on the lot. If the irrevocable bidder is advising anyone with respect to the lot, Sotheby’s requires the irrevocable bidder to disclose his or her financial interest in the lot. If an agent is advising you or bidding on your behalf with respect to a lot identified as being subject to an irrevocable bid, you should request that the agent disclose whether or not he or she has a financial interest in the lot.
Artist's Resale Right
Purchase of lots marked with this symbol will be subject to the payment of the artist's resale right.
Double Dagger
Indicates that the lot is being sold whilst subject to Temporary Importation, and that VAT is due at the reduced rate
Guaranteed Property
Guaranteed Property. The seller of lots with this symbol has been guaranteed a minimum price from one auction or a series of auctions. If every lot in a catalogue is guaranteed, the Conditions of Sale will so state and this symbol will not be used for each lot.
300,000400,000
拍品已售 394,000 英鎊 成交價 (含買家佣金)
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拍品詳情

當代·當下:大衛·泰格故藏

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倫敦

Hurvin Anderson
生於1965年
MARLENE'S
signed with the artist's initials, titled and dated April 2005 on the overlap; titled on the stretcher
oil on canvas
88.5 by 146 cm. 34 7/8 by 57 1/2 in.
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來源

Thomas Dane Gallery, London

Acquired from the above by David Teiger in 2005

展覽

London, Thomas Dane Gallery, Hurvin Anderson: New Paintings, June - July 2005, n.p., no. 12, illustrated in colour

相關資料

Combining elements of Hurvin Anderson’s highly celebrated Country Club and Welcome series, Marlene’s depicts a bar interior partially obscured by a tessellating chain-link fence. Masterfully juxtaposing the geometric abstraction created by the grille with punctuating details, such as the strip lighting across the top of the canvas and the assortment of coloured objects on the right hand side, Marlene’s is characterised by its immense sense of depth, which binds all the very best works of Anderson’s oeuvre. As Thelma Golden, director of The Studio Museum in Harlem at the time of the artist’s exhibition there, noted, “All of Hurvin’s work seems to me to incorporate an intense amount of depth. Depth of field, depth of colour, and even depth of subject” (Thelma Golden in conversation with Vicky Lowry, ‘Hurvin Anderson’, Elle Decor, April 2011, p. 88). However, this depth of field is, as Eddie Chambers points out, “somewhat disconcerting” as it renders the viewer “uncertain as to what might lie immediately behind the patterned grille” (Eddie Chambers, ‘Double consciousness’, in: Exh. Cat., Birmingham, Ikon Gallery, Hurvin Anderson: reporting back, 2013, p. 77). The space depicted is thus an intermediate one, insistently occupying a different plane to the viewer, who becomes a voyeur to the scene that unfolds in the painting.

This barricade that Anderson erects between viewer and subject is entirely characteristic of a body of work that directly confronts the legacy of colonialism in the Caribbean. As Eddie Chambers observes, Anderson’s Jamaica is “very different to that enjoyed by holidaymakers from the US or Europe” (Ibid., p. 76). This is partially due to the sense of dislocation that the artist felt when he visited Trinidad in 2002: despite his having never been there before, people assumed he was a local. This dichotomy of belonging and displacement is reflected in many of his paintings from this period, as it provided a neat parallel to the status of black people in the Caribbean during the colonial era. However most strikingly, and most divorced from the white Western tourist’s experience, is the literal construction of barriers throughout the Caribbean. Ornate grilles that cover every door and first floor window are ostensibly decorative, but there can be no ambiguity regarding their true purpose, and by association, no preventing a pervasive sense of the potential for violence and crime.

Through the grilles that Anderson paints, interiors become caged entities, confined and threatened. The viewer looks through the bars of this cage as he would in a zoo, the objects pedestalised and rendered redundant, the scene presented as an exhibit. In doing so he becomes complicit in the othering process that is inherent in colonial discourse, the observer of an involuntary subject. Forcing the viewer to confront the legacy of a dominant white narrative in art criticism and appreciation, Anderson creates a psychological barrier in addition to the literal barrier of the grille, which in turn echoes the work of his former teacher, Peter Doig, whose Concrete Cabins see Le Corbusier’s utopian Unité d’Habitation slip in and out of view behind a screen of tree trunks. The effect of this is disorienting and unsettling – the viewer cannot fully view the subject of the picture.

Veering between figuration and abstraction, Marlene’s epitomises the multifaceted nature of the artist’s practice. From the named but unseen proprietor to the locus of relaxation to which the viewer is denied entry, the painting is riddled with moments of disquiet that give the viewer pause. However, as Jennifer Higgie noted in her essay for Anderson’s seminal exhibition at Ikon Gallery in 2013, “despite the allusions in the paintings to the complex histories of leisure, politics and control… meaning is open-ended and allusive rather than emphatic” (Jennifer Higgie, ‘Another word for feeling’, in: Exh. Cat., Birmingham, Ikon Gallery, op. cit., p. 11). Avoiding didacticism whilst retaining the conceptual tenets that underpin all of the artist’s best work, Marlene’s epitomises the thoughtful practice that earned the artist a Turner prize nomination in 2017 and has brought him to international acclaim.

當代·當下:大衛·泰格故藏

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倫敦