401
401
A silver, burgauté lacquer, enamel and coral table cigar box and accompanying cigarette box, attributed to Cartier, French, circa 1920
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401
A silver, burgauté lacquer, enamel and coral table cigar box and accompanying cigarette box, attributed to Cartier, French, circa 1920
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拍品詳情

歐洲傢俱與工藝品

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倫敦

A silver, burgauté lacquer, enamel and coral table cigar box and accompanying cigarette box, attributed to Cartier, French, circa 1920
in Chinese taste, the cigar box rectangular, the cigarette box of upright shaped section with incurved corners, each with silver lid centred with a Chinese openwork coral knop, set within geometrical black decorationt, T pattern borders and an additional cylindrical ornament at each corner, the sides formed of burgauté lacquer with delicate riverscape scenery featuring pagodas, bridges and fishermen in boats, the cigarette box with further diaper decoration, on red enamelled slightly protruding corners, the cigar box lined with cedarwood, each with partially illegible maker's lozenge mark possibly for Maurice Couët, boar's head control mark
數量: 2
18.3cm., 7 1/8 in. wide: 13 cm., 5 1/8 in. high
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來源

The Property of a Private Collector

相關資料

‘Once, Cartier was master of the exquisite objet d’art: his miniature plants, destined for the princely boudoir in their delicate houses, reminded us of the Japanese and Chinese art of the Belle Epoque, with their jade leaves and quartz blossoms. But today he restricts himself to practical matters – the cigarette case and the vanity case, the familiar necessities of modern life’, states the report on Cartier’s contribution to the Paris Exhibition in 1925, published in the Gazette du bon ton of the same year. Although the present cigar and cigarette box doubtlessly have a more practical function than the iconic jewels for which the French company, founded by Louis-Jean Cartier in 1847, had become so famous, they are far from being plain domestic items. Very much in line with the European affinity for the Far East, small lacquer panels with delicate scenery, often of 18th or 19th century Chinese or Japanese origin, were combined with distinct geometric patterns, perceived as Asian, and with certain materials, such as coral, onyx, or jade which were extremely suitable for the colour and design schemes of the Art Deco period. The combination which is shown in the present caskets, as well as in different boxes and cases in private collections, was also used for clocks made for Cartier in the mid 1920s, such as for the ‘modèle écran’ clock by Maurice Couët, 1927 (Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, Inv. 27898). Cartier’s fascination with lacquer had begun as early as 1888, when the Vicomtesse de Bonnemain commissioned the French jeweller with the conversion of her Chinese lacquer cabinet into a jewel case. About 15 years later, Louis Cartier purchased a Chinese lacquer snuffbox with French 18th century cage work and another decade later, he started systematically collecting imported Asian lacquer panels from the leading Parisian antique dealers. These were then mounted in vanity cases and smoker’s requisites. Although Baron de Meyer had commented that the new dramatic colour combination of red, green, black and silver, introduced by Cartier in the 1920s, was a dangerous one and required very careful handling (Harper’s Bazaar, New York, March 1926), these two boxes demonstrate its success.

歐洲傢俱與工藝品

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倫敦