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A Louis XVI sycamore, satiné and Japan lacquer meuble d'entre-deux formant secrétaire, attributed to Martin Carlin
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32
A Louis XVI sycamore, satiné and Japan lacquer meuble d'entre-deux formant secrétaire, attributed to Martin Carlin
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拍品詳情

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巴黎

A Louis XVI sycamore, satiné and Japan lacquer meuble d'entre-deux formant secrétaire, attributed to Martin Carlin
the white marble top above the fall-front opening to reval four drawers and three compartments, above a pair of cupboard doors revealing a shelf, flanked by four shelves on each side ; the lock inscribed T. Parsons patentee (this cabinet was probably restored in England during 19th century)
Haut. 96 cm, larg. 99 cm, prof. 26 cm ; height 37 3/4 in; width 39 in; depth 10 1/4 in
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相關資料

Created during Louis XIV’s reign, furniture decorated with lacquer panels from the Far East remained popular throughout the 18th century. Lazare Duvaux’s demise in 1785 marked the end of the Rococo style with Chinoiserie. Japanese lacquers were then more favored than Chinese lacquers, due to their subdued decoration. These Japanese lacquers came mostly from boxes and cabinets, resulting in smaller panels with narrower compositions. The quality of Japanese lacquer was unmistakable and required the finest bronzes and most splendid cabinetmaking. The gap then widened between the greater cabinetmakers who had access to these lacquers and who benefited from prestigious orders (Carlin, Weisweiler, Joseph, Saunier and Riesener) and the intermediate craftsmen who were reduced to imitating Japanese lacquers as best they could. The 18th century inventories mention only two or three Japanese lacquered furniture in each collection, thus proving the preciousness and rarity of these pieces of furniture since their inception.

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巴黎