143
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SOLD BY THE WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART TO BENEFIT FUTURE ACQUISITIONS

Adolph Gottlieb
MOOD
估價
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Lots with this symbol indicate that a party has provided Sotheby’s with an irrevocable bid on the lot that will be executed during the sale at a value that ensures that the lot will sell. The irrevocable bidder, who may bid in excess of the irrevocable bid, will be compensated based on the final hammer price in the event he or she is not the successful bidder or may receive a fixed fee in the event he or she is the successful bidder. If the irrevocable bidder is the successful bidder, the fixed fee (if applicable) for providing the irrevocable bid may be netted against the irrevocable bidder’s obligation to pay the full purchase price for the lot and the purchase price reported for the lot shall be net of such fixed fee. If the irrevocable bid is not secured until after the printing of the auction catalogue, a pre-lot announcement will be made indicating that there is an irrevocable bid on the lot. If the irrevocable bidder is advising anyone with respect to the lot, Sotheby’s requires the irrevocable bidder to disclose his or her financial interest in the lot. If an agent is advising you or bidding on your behalf with respect to a lot identified as being subject to an irrevocable bid, you should request that the agent disclose whether or not he or she has a financial interest in the lot.
Guaranteed Property
Guaranteed Property. The seller of lots with this symbol has been guaranteed a minimum price from one auction or a series of auctions. If every lot in a catalogue is guaranteed, the Conditions of Sale will so state and this symbol will not be used for each lot.
800,0001,200,000
拍品已售 1,179,000 美元 成交價 (含買家佣金)
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143

SOLD BY THE WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART TO BENEFIT FUTURE ACQUISITIONS

Adolph Gottlieb
MOOD
估價
Irrevocable Bids
Lots with this symbol indicate that a party has provided Sotheby’s with an irrevocable bid on the lot that will be executed during the sale at a value that ensures that the lot will sell. The irrevocable bidder, who may bid in excess of the irrevocable bid, will be compensated based on the final hammer price in the event he or she is not the successful bidder or may receive a fixed fee in the event he or she is the successful bidder. If the irrevocable bidder is the successful bidder, the fixed fee (if applicable) for providing the irrevocable bid may be netted against the irrevocable bidder’s obligation to pay the full purchase price for the lot and the purchase price reported for the lot shall be net of such fixed fee. If the irrevocable bid is not secured until after the printing of the auction catalogue, a pre-lot announcement will be made indicating that there is an irrevocable bid on the lot. If the irrevocable bidder is advising anyone with respect to the lot, Sotheby’s requires the irrevocable bidder to disclose his or her financial interest in the lot. If an agent is advising you or bidding on your behalf with respect to a lot identified as being subject to an irrevocable bid, you should request that the agent disclose whether or not he or she has a financial interest in the lot.
Guaranteed Property
Guaranteed Property. The seller of lots with this symbol has been guaranteed a minimum price from one auction or a series of auctions. If every lot in a catalogue is guaranteed, the Conditions of Sale will so state and this symbol will not be used for each lot.
800,0001,200,000
拍品已售 1,179,000 美元 成交價 (含買家佣金)
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拍品詳情

當代藝術日拍

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Adolph Gottlieb
1903-1974年
MOOD
signed, titled and dated 1969 on the reverse
oil on canvas
60 by 48 in. 152.4 by 121.9 cm.
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來源

Gift of the artist to the present owner in 1969

展覽

New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, Recent Acquisitions: April 1969-April 1970, June - July 1970
New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, Selections from the Permanent Collection, January - February 1971
New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, Selections from the Permanent Collection, March - April  1973
New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, Selections from the Permanent Collection 1950-1973, July - August 1973
Bogota, Museo de Arte Moderno; Museo de Arte de São Paulo; Rio de Janeiro, Museo de Arte Moderna; Caracas, Museo de Bella Artes; Mexico City, Museo de Arte Moderna, Color as Language, February - November 1975
New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, 30 Years of American Art: 1945-1975, Selection from the Permanent Collection III, August - October 1977
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Fine Arts Center, 20th Century American Painting: An Inaugural Exhibition for the Dorothy Patten Fine Arts Series, September - October 1980, cat. no. 8
Wilkes-Barre, Wilkes College, Sordoni Art Gallery, Students of Eight, April - May 1981, cat. no. 20, p. 15, illustrated

相關資料

Sublimely grand in scale and arresting in composition and rich color, Mood epitomizes the elemental dynamism and tremendous painterly force at the core of Adolph Gottlieb’s celebrated body of work. Having remained in the prestigious permanent collection of the Whitney Museum since being gifted by the artist in the year of its execution, Mood boasts not only superlative quality but also incomparably pristine and distinguished provenance. Equally exceptional is its rare and ravishing combination of colors, as layered washes of organic and earthy charcoal vividly contrast with the extraordinary opaque lavender burst, hovering over an expansive russet ground. A powerful union of radically opposing forms, the present work is paradigmatic of Gottlieb’s acclaimed Burst series, which stands as his most innovative contribution to the transformation of modern post-war painting. The concentrated chocolate orb and animated mass of light purple brushstrokes, suspended in dynamic symmetry, evoke the myriad dualities and dichotomies underlying Gottlieb’s abstraction to produce a composition that radiates with vibrant energy. While conveying the artist’s prodigious command of both gestural painting and color theory, the work resists classification with the “Action” or “Color Field” paintings of Gottlieb’s contemporaries. Instead, Mood enacts a captivating synthesis between these two modes of Abstract Expressionism, drawing the viewer into the volatile balance of Gottlieb’s magnetic composition.

With tremendous graphic power and elemental force, Mood exemplifies Gottlieb’s unique brand of mark-making, in which he juxtaposes two fundamental elements—the glowing orb and the eponymous “burst”—and unmoors them upon a monochromatic flattened space. Esteemed critic Brian O’Doherty described the development of Gottlieb’s signature language thus: “His motif has orbited into electrifying new fields of color, the horizon dropping away completely, the globes, usually single, now taking on a new radiance, raised with an almost palpable transgression of gravity as they dip and swim steadfastly over the explosive calligraphs below—writhing, kinking, hooked, twisted, contracted, precisely exploded—all the verbs are active in this extraordinary visual grammar” (in “Adolph Gottlieb: The Dualism of an Inner Life,” The New York Times, 23 February 1964, p. 17). Here, soft washes of sorrel and cinnamon provide an ideal velvety ground for the electric tension between the gestural, explosive roseate splatter and the serene resolution of the suspended auburn sphere. By engaging these two polar bodies in contentious opposition, Gottlieb creates a composition that crackles with the scintillating possibility of sudden collapse.

Mood revels in the infinite dichotomies of its structure: the opposition of stasis and motion, color and shadow, form and stroke, celestial and subterranean. The dramatic mass of luminous pink strokes is painted in an emotive, painterly manner reminiscent of the gestural expressionism of Jackson Pollock or Franz Kline. In contrast, the sublime color and soft, burnished amber of the lofty orb calls to mind the Color Field paintings of Helen Frankenthaler and Mark Rothko. While the two schools are often seen as mutually exclusive, Gottlieb combines them with a masterful grasp of multifaceted abstraction, skillfully playing them against each other to enhance the texture of the work. The artist’s practice was also inspired by contemporaneous influences outside the artistic sphere. In the devastating aftermath of World War II and the gnawing threat of nuclear disaster throughout the Cold War, the Burst paintings and their conflicting images represented a powerful expression of the constant tension between West and East, peace and war, hope and fear, existence and destruction—elemental dichotomies placed into dynamic synchronicity within a single frame.

The Burst paintings mark the fulfillment of Gottlieb’s desire to resolve the eternal conflict of life’s infinite oppositions through the achievement of an artistic language that was at once infinitely universal and deeply personal. Like Barnett Newman with his "zip," and Rothko with his floating bands, Gottlieb perfected his "burst," a crucial declaration of his artistic legacy. In powerful, elemental forms, he articulates the tension inherent to the natural world, uniting the binary poles of Abstract Expressionism in a single, balanced synthesis. Pulsating with visual and psychic electricity that emits a hypnotic lure, Mood represents the apotheosis of Gottlieb’s career-long pursuit of this goal.

當代藝術日拍

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