125
125

THE HISTORY OF NOW: THE COLLECTION OF DAVID TEIGER

Maurizio Cattelan
TOURISTS
估價
Irrevocable Bids
Lots with this symbol indicate that a party has provided Sotheby’s with an irrevocable bid on the lot that will be executed during the sale at a value that ensures that the lot will sell. The irrevocable bidder, who may bid in excess of the irrevocable bid, will be compensated based on the final hammer price in the event he or she is not the successful bidder or may receive a fixed fee in the event he or she is the successful bidder. If the irrevocable bidder is the successful bidder, the fixed fee (if applicable) for providing the irrevocable bid may be netted against the irrevocable bidder’s obligation to pay the full purchase price for the lot and the purchase price reported for the lot shall be net of such fixed fee. If the irrevocable bid is not secured until after the printing of the auction catalogue, a pre-lot announcement will be made indicating that there is an irrevocable bid on the lot. If the irrevocable bidder is advising anyone with respect to the lot, Sotheby’s requires the irrevocable bidder to disclose his or her financial interest in the lot. If an agent is advising you or bidding on your behalf with respect to a lot identified as being subject to an irrevocable bid, you should request that the agent disclose whether or not he or she has a financial interest in the lot.
Artist's Resale Right
Purchase of lots marked with this symbol will be subject to the payment of the artist's resale right.
Double Dagger
Indicates that the lot is being sold whilst subject to Temporary Importation, and that VAT is due at the reduced rate
Guaranteed Property
Guaranteed Property. The seller of lots with this symbol has been guaranteed a minimum price from one auction or a series of auctions. If every lot in a catalogue is guaranteed, the Conditions of Sale will so state and this symbol will not be used for each lot.
120,000180,000
拍品已售 200,000 英鎊 成交價 (含買家佣金)
前往
125

THE HISTORY OF NOW: THE COLLECTION OF DAVID TEIGER

Maurizio Cattelan
TOURISTS
估價
Irrevocable Bids
Lots with this symbol indicate that a party has provided Sotheby’s with an irrevocable bid on the lot that will be executed during the sale at a value that ensures that the lot will sell. The irrevocable bidder, who may bid in excess of the irrevocable bid, will be compensated based on the final hammer price in the event he or she is not the successful bidder or may receive a fixed fee in the event he or she is the successful bidder. If the irrevocable bidder is the successful bidder, the fixed fee (if applicable) for providing the irrevocable bid may be netted against the irrevocable bidder’s obligation to pay the full purchase price for the lot and the purchase price reported for the lot shall be net of such fixed fee. If the irrevocable bid is not secured until after the printing of the auction catalogue, a pre-lot announcement will be made indicating that there is an irrevocable bid on the lot. If the irrevocable bidder is advising anyone with respect to the lot, Sotheby’s requires the irrevocable bidder to disclose his or her financial interest in the lot. If an agent is advising you or bidding on your behalf with respect to a lot identified as being subject to an irrevocable bid, you should request that the agent disclose whether or not he or she has a financial interest in the lot.
Artist's Resale Right
Purchase of lots marked with this symbol will be subject to the payment of the artist's resale right.
Double Dagger
Indicates that the lot is being sold whilst subject to Temporary Importation, and that VAT is due at the reduced rate
Guaranteed Property
Guaranteed Property. The seller of lots with this symbol has been guaranteed a minimum price from one auction or a series of auctions. If every lot in a catalogue is guaranteed, the Conditions of Sale will so state and this symbol will not be used for each lot.
120,000180,000
拍品已售 200,000 英鎊 成交價 (含買家佣金)
前往

拍品詳情

當代藝術日拍

|
倫敦

Maurizio Cattelan
生於1960年
TOURISTS
nine taxidermied pigeons
smallest: 12.7 by 35.6 by 10.2 cm. 5 by 14 by 4 in. largest: 21.6 by 38.1 by 11.4 cm. 8 1/2 by 15 by 4 1/2 in.
overall dimensions variable
Executed in 1998.
參閱狀況報告 參閱狀況報告

This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist.

來源

Galerie Emmanuel Perrotin, Paris
Private Collection, Paris
Polly Robinson Gaer, London
Acquired from the above by David Teiger in 2002

展覽

Venice, Italian Pavillion, XLVII Biennale Internazionale dell'Arte di Venezia, ILLUMInazioni, June - November 1997 (another variant exhibited)
Basel, Kunsthalle Basel, Maurizio Cattelan, October - November 1999, n.p., no. 3, illustrated in colour (another variant exhibited)
New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Maurizio Cattelan: All, November 2011 - January 2012, p. 91, illustrated in colour (another variant exhibited)

出版

Giorgio Verzotti, Ed., Maurizio Cattelan: Castello di Rivoli, Milan 1999, pp. 28-29, illustrated in colour (variant unknown)
Francesco Bonami, Nancy Spector and Barbara Vanderlinden, Eds., Maurizio Cattelan, London 2000, pp. 20-21, illustrated in colour (variant unknown)
Enrica Melossi and Martina Mondadori, Eds. Maurizio Cattelan, Verona 2006, p. 60, illustrated in colour (variant unknown)
Francesco Bonami, Ed., Maurizio Cattelan: Super Contemporanea, Milan 2006, p. 106, illustrated in colour (variant unknown)

相關資料

The second time Maurizio Cattelan was invited to represent Italy at the Venice Biennale, in 1997, he filled the galleries of the Italian Pavilion with stuffed pigeons, an installation he named Turisti. Curated by Germano Celant, the central theme of the Biennale was the mixing of the generations in Post-War Italian art. Cattelan, as one of the younger Italian artists, though one whose work in fact follows strongly in the tradition of modern Italian art, responded to this challenge in a typically idiosyncratic way.

Only a month before the opening, he visited the space where he was to exhibit only to find a chaotic and abandoned Italian Pavilion; “the inside was a shambles and it was filled, really filled, with pigeons. For me as an Italian, it was like seeing something you're not supposed to see, like the dressing room of the Pope. But then again, that is the situation in Venice, so I thought I should just present it as it is, a normal situation”(Maurizio Cattelan cited in: ‘Nancy Spector in conversation with Maurizio Cattelan’, in: Francesco Bonami et al., Maurizio Cattelan, London 2000, p. 19). The exhibition juxtaposed works by Enzo Cucchi and Ettore Spalletti alongside those of Cattelan, creating a conflicting harmony that brought to the fore each of the artist’s creative preoccupations. Cattelan, true to his singular artistic approach, created artworks that were meant to disrupt the viewer’s perception, offering a sarcastic commentary on Cucchi and Spalleti’s own works. In an interview with Nancy Spector, Cattelan spoke of his installation saying: “We have to kill the father – otherwise we have to lick his feet […] I did a little of both, it was in-between. I tried to make my fathers laugh, while taking away some of the space devoted to them” (Ibid., p. 18). As such, Cattelan installed a chandelier that hung directly in front of Cucchi’s paintings, bicycles were leaned against the wall next to Spalletti’s monochromes, and ultimately pigeons roosting along the ventilation ducts and their fake droppings on the floor leaving the visitors astonished and with a sense of eeriness as for once, it was them being observed and not the other way around.

Just as the Turisti from the Venice Biennale, this version - created one year later - is also a reflection of the millions of tourists who travel to Venice every year. Perched above the rafters of the Pavilion, they are art objects that mimic their audience of visitors, seeming to be also duped witnesses of an empty pavilion. In emphasising the empty space of the pavilion, through these birds, Cattelan was also drawing the notion of time as a defining element of space. "I guess if there was anything really provocative about this work it was in its relationship to time", Cattelan has said, "time doesn't affect this place; basically all the Biennales look the same. If I could, I would love to set up the same show twice in two consecutive Biennales. I think that no-one would notice. So I installed the birds and the bird shit to prove that everything stands still in that place, that 'Time goes by so slowly'- that is another song" (Ibid., p. 22).

當代藝術日拍

|
倫敦