349
349

PROPERTY FROM THE JOHN MURRAY COLLECTION

Thomas Tompion. An oyster and marquetry month-going longcase clock, London, circa 1680, movement and case associated
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349

PROPERTY FROM THE JOHN MURRAY COLLECTION

Thomas Tompion. An oyster and marquetry month-going longcase clock, London, circa 1680, movement and case associated
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拍品詳情

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Thomas Tompion. An oyster and marquetry month-going longcase clock, London, circa 1680, movement and case associated
10-inch latched dial with wheatear border, signed along the lower edge Tho Tompion Londini Fecit, winged cherub spandrels, finely matted centre with subsidiary seconds dial and date aperture,  the movement with six latched, knopped and ringed pillars, anchor escapement, reversed five wheel trains, external locking plate striking on a bell, the associated case with carved and parcel gilt scroll cresting above ebonised spiral hood pilasters to the rising hood, the trunk door inlaid in various woods and green-stained bone with panels of flowers and figures on an oyster ground, the sides with crossbanded oyster veneer, the plinth inlaid with a vase of flowers, on bun feet,
208cm. 6ft. 9¾in. high
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來源

Possibly Dr A Douglas-Heath, Edgbaston, Birmingham sold in his sale July 1937.
John Murray, friend and trading partner of Percy Webster and thence by descent to the current owner.

相關資料

Thomas Tompion (1639-1713), the greatest of English clockmakers was born the son of a blacksmith in the parish of Northill, Bedfordshire. 

There is no record of Thomas Tompion serving as an apprentice in a clockmaker's workshop but in 1671 he was admitted to the Clockmakers' Company in London as a `Brother' and two and a half years later was made a 'Free Clockmaker upon Redemption' and allowed to set up his own workshop and take apprentices. During this important year he moved into an influential circle where he met Robert Hooke and John Flamsteed who introduced him to other distinguished scientists of the day, the nobility and King Charles II.

Shortly after 1680 Tompion devised a numbering system for all the clocks and watches that he made and this was continued after his death by his successor George Graham. Thomas Tompion died in 1713 and an indication of the high esteem in which he was held during his lifetime was demonstrated by his burial in Westminster Abbey. 

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