331
331

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE COLLECTION

A George III carved mahogany Gainsborough armchair, circa 1760, attributed to Paul Saunders
前往
331

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE COLLECTION

A George III carved mahogany Gainsborough armchair, circa 1760, attributed to Paul Saunders
前往

拍品詳情

珍藏雲集

|
倫敦

A George III carved mahogany Gainsborough armchair, circa 1760, attributed to Paul Saunders
in a close-nailed caramel silk damask upholstery
參閱狀況報告 參閱狀況報告

來源

Acquired from John Keil, 1985.

相關資料

This armchair can be attributed on stylistic grounds to the workshop of Paul Saunders (1722-71), an 'upholder' and cabinet-maker of Soho, London. The beautifully carved form and ornament reflects the influence of ‘French’ designs for chairs in Thomas Chippendale's The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker's Director, 1754 (pls. XVIII-XIX). Indeed, Saunders was a subscriber to the Director, and was undoubtedly inspired by Chippendale’s designs.

Although most of Saunders’ work is undocumented, he supplied a closely related set of ten ‘elbow’ armchairs to the 1st Earl of Leicester for Holkham Hall, Norfolk in 1757[1]. The pattern of the offered chair with the furled acanthus detail to the armrest, foliate carved cabochons and distinctive scrolled foot, is a variation of the Holkham suite distinguished only by the addition of antique fluting, a trait possibly unique to Saunders’ workshop. For a related pair supplied to 1st Marquess of Bath (1734-1796) for Longleat, Wiltshire, and also attributed to Saunders, see those sold Christie’s, Longleat, 13 June 2002, lot 338 (£68,000).

[1] Coleridge, A., Chippendale Furniture, London, 1968, p. 211, fig. 378.

珍藏雲集

|
倫敦