938
938
A VERY RARE WILLIAM AND MARY CHERRYWOOD CAPSTOCK, NEW YORK STATE, CIRCA 1720
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938
A VERY RARE WILLIAM AND MARY CHERRYWOOD CAPSTOCK, NEW YORK STATE, CIRCA 1720
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拍品詳情

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

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A VERY RARE WILLIAM AND MARY CHERRYWOOD CAPSTOCK, NEW YORK STATE, CIRCA 1720
appears to retain its original surface; with five turned walnut pegs on a molded backboard with original hanging devices on the back; one peg is a period replacement.
Height 4 7/8 in. by Width 38 3/4 in. by Depth 6 in.; 12.4 by 98.4 by 15.2 cm.
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來源

Roderick Blackburn, Kinderhook, New York, November 2001;
Vogel Collection no. 696.

相關資料

Capstocks are a form of clothes rack that were used by the New York Dutch in the seventeenth and early eighteenth century.  Very few survive today.  Two late seventeenth century New York inventories attest to their use.  Cornells Van Dyke whose 1686 estate amounted to 1,428 beavers and had a typical mixture of furniture in his house.  One room contained a walnut bedstead with dark say hangings and silk fringe, " a walnut chest of drawers with a press for napkins atop of it," an oak table and carpet, eight Spanish stools, and walnut capstock to hang clothes upon.  Cornelis Steenwyck and mayor of New York whose home was “south of Bridge Street and east of the Fort” had an estate valued in 1686 at a remarkable £15,931-15-1.  In his Great Chamber is listed one capstock (see Esther Singleton, The Furniture of Our Forefathers, (New York: Doubleday, Page and Company, 1901), pp. 246, 253).

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

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