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Two works in one volume: Muhammad Qasim Hindu Shah Astarabadi Firishtah (d.circa 1620), Tarikh-e firishta, a history of Hindustan; Sikandar ibn Muhammad known as Manju (early 17th century), Tarikh-e salatin-e Gujarat, commissioned by the Talpur ruler of Sind Mir Karam’ali Khan (d.1828 AD), copied by Abu’l-Khayr, India, dated 1238 AH/1823 AD
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52
Two works in one volume: Muhammad Qasim Hindu Shah Astarabadi Firishtah (d.circa 1620), Tarikh-e firishta, a history of Hindustan; Sikandar ibn Muhammad known as Manju (early 17th century), Tarikh-e salatin-e Gujarat, commissioned by the Talpur ruler of Sind Mir Karam’ali Khan (d.1828 AD), copied by Abu’l-Khayr, India, dated 1238 AH/1823 AD
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拍品詳情

伊斯蘭藝術

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Two works in one volume: Muhammad Qasim Hindu Shah Astarabadi Firishtah (d.circa 1620), Tarikh-e firishta, a history of Hindustan; Sikandar ibn Muhammad known as Manju (early 17th century), Tarikh-e salatin-e Gujarat, commissioned by the Talpur ruler of Sind Mir Karam’ali Khan (d.1828 AD), copied by Abu’l-Khayr, India, dated 1238 AH/1823 AD
Persian manuscript on paper, 297 leaves plus 3 fly-leaves, 27 lines to the page written in fine nasta’liq in black ink, ruled in gold and blue, 2 illuminated double pages each decorated with a floral heading and interlacing gold scrolls in the border, in a later red velvet binding
40.6 by 26.4cm.
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相關資料

Muhammad Qasim Hindu Shah was born in Astrabad in 1560 and as a child moved to Ahmednagar, following his father who had been hired as a Persian teacher by the court of Miran Husain Nizam Shah. Around 1588 he moved to Bijapur at the service of King Ibrahim Adil II who soon after commissioned him a story of India and of the Deccan dynasties.

The Tarikh-e firishta, also known as the Gulshan-I Ibrahim, presents a historical account of India, beginning before the Muslim conquest and describing the kingdoms and provinces as well more legendary events and facts connected to its geography. It is divided in twelve sections, the first ten of which give the historical account of the various kingdoms. The eleventh deals with the Muslims of Malabar and the twelfth presents the history of various Muslim saints in India. The conclusion focuses on climate and geography. Another copy of the work, dated 1152 AH/1739-40 AD is now in the Cambridge Library (inv. no.Add.2623).

Mir Karam’ali Khan Talpur (d.1828) was one of the four brothers who ruled Hyderabad, known as chahar yar ‘Four Friends’. He was a poet with the pen-name ‘Karam’ and described as well-educated and a man of literary tastes, drawing poets and learned men to his court. He compiled a book of select verses from different sources and named it Majmu’ah-ye-delgosha. He was fond of rich and beautiful swords and imported skilled sword-makers, scribes and painters. A sword bearing his name was sold in these rooms, 12 October 2000, lot 198. 

伊斯蘭藝術

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