1974
1974
A RARE HARDSTONE-INSET CLOISONNE AND CHAMPLEVE GILT-BRONZE SEATED AMITAYUS
QING DYNASTY, QIANLONG PERIOD
前往
1974
A RARE HARDSTONE-INSET CLOISONNE AND CHAMPLEVE GILT-BRONZE SEATED AMITAYUS
QING DYNASTY, QIANLONG PERIOD
前往

拍品詳情

中國瓷器及工藝品

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香港

A RARE HARDSTONE-INSET CLOISONNE AND CHAMPLEVE GILT-BRONZE SEATED AMITAYUS
QING DYNASTY, QIANLONG PERIOD
with hands held in dhyanamudra supporting a vase with a cintamani emblem, the face with serene expression adorned with an urna on the forehead, the hair partially drawn up in a knotted jatamakuta secured by a hardstone-inset ornament worn behind a five-leaf crown, with tresses of hair falling to the shoulders, further embellished with jewelled earrings, beaded necklaces, bracelets, armbands, and anklets, a scarf around the bare shoulders flowing over the arms, wearing a voluminous lower garment gathered at the waist and fastened by a beaded girdle, seated in dhyanasana with dhoti falling from legs, backed by a cloisonné and champlevé decorated flaming mandorla, set with religious motifs including garuda and makaras, all supported on a circular waisted base pedestal similarly decorated with lotus scrolls and tiered petals
31 cm., 12 1/4 in.
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來源

Acquired in Zurich, 1996.
Collection of Veena and Peter Schnell.

相關資料

This splendid figure of Amitayus is an extremely rare example of Buddhist sculpture incorporating cloisonné and champlevé enamel techniques.  A closely related example, and possibly a companion to the present figure, but missing the gilt openwork component of the mandorla from the Berti Aschmann collection and now in the Museum Rietberg, Zurich, was included in the exhibition On the Path to Enlightenment, Museum Reitberg, Zurich, 1995, cat. no. 34. Such figures may have comprised part of a larger group produced for the emperor to mark a special occasion or for one of the many Tibetan Buddhist temples in the capital; see a set of gilt bronze figures in the main hall of the Yuhuatai (Pavilion of Raining Flowers) photographed in situ and illustrated in Cultural Relics of Tibetan Buddhism Collected in the Qing Palace, Hong Kong, 1992, pl. 103.

A smaller figure of Amitayus, similarly seated before a gilt bronze flaming mandorla and on a rectangular base, the crown, robes and base decorated in cloisonné enamel, is published in Buddhist Statues in Yonghegong, Beijing, 2001, pl. 48; and a large figure of Maitreya with enamelled robes was sold in our London rooms, 9th May 1986, lot 625. Compare also a cloisonné enamel pedestal of lotus flower form, surmounted by a tall mandorla and set with a later rock crystal figure of Guanyin, sold in our London rooms, 10th June 1986, lot 83. For small champlevé enamel decorated figures, see a seated Buddha on a double-lotus pedal, with a Qianlong reign mark and of the period, sold in our London rooms, 9th April 1974, lot 316; and a figure of a seated lohan, attributed to the Ming dynasty, included in the Oriental Ceramics Society exhibition The Arts of the Ming Dynasty, The Arts Council Gallery, London, 1957, cat. no. 295.

Amitayus, the Buddha of Infinite Life, is the deity associated with the rites that ensure long life. The deity is especially worshipped by Tibetans, who believe that life can be extended through long lineages, faith and compassion. It is also believed that one can achieve self-enlightenment and cater to the welfare of others with the help of Amitayus. It was during Qianlong's reign that the popularity and worship of Amitayus increased substantially due to the emperor's self-identification with this deity.

中國瓷器及工藝品

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香港