1939
1939

PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

A SPINACH JADE ARCHAISTIC TRIPOD CENSER AND COVER
QING DYNASTY, QIANLONG PERIOD
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1939

PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

A SPINACH JADE ARCHAISTIC TRIPOD CENSER AND COVER
QING DYNASTY, QIANLONG PERIOD
前往

拍品詳情

中國瓷器及工藝品

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香港

A SPINACH JADE ARCHAISTIC TRIPOD CENSER AND COVER
QING DYNASTY, QIANLONG PERIOD
the stone of a deep spinach-green tone with natural veins, inclusions, and lighter patches, the censer carved with shallow sides rising from a pronounced foot, decorated on the exterior in low relief with a continuous band of formalised archaistic kui dragons, flanked by a pair of openwork handles, each modelled as the head of a mythical beast with bulging eyes, elaborate eyelashes, upright ears and curled double-tongue, all raised by three mythical animal mask legs, the fitted cover surmounted by a high-relief lotus knop, enclosed by a ring of pendant lotus petals and a further band of kui dragons in low relief
width across handles 23.3 cm., 9 1/8 in.
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來源

Collection of Stanley Charles Nott.
Collection of Mrs. Christian Holmes (by repute).
Bonhams, San Francisco, 21st June 2006, lot 3134.

出版

Stanley Charles Nott, Chinese Art of World Renown, St. Augustine, 1944, p. 24, pl. 12.
Stanley Charles Nott, The Flowery Kingdom, New York, 1947, p. 196, plate XCVI.

相關資料

Continuing the Song dynasty tradition of carving jade vessels in the form of archaic bronzes, the craftsmen of the Qing dynasty adapted classical forms and fused them together with various decorative elements to result in wares suited to contemporary taste. The present lot incorporates archaistic elements, such as the form which is based on the archaic bronze gui and the kui dragons on the body and cover, with highly stylised and modern elements such as the handles in the form of winged creatures and lotus flower knop.

No other closely related example appears to have been published, although components can be seen adorning censers of this type; see a celadon jade tripod censer flanked with similarly modelled handles from the Avery Brundage collection and now in the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, illustrated in Rene-Yvon Lefebvre d'Argence, Chinese Jades in the Avery Brundage Collection, San Francisco, 1977 pl. LIV; another sold in our New York rooms, 19th March 2007, lot 633; and one resting on a circular foot sold at Christie's New York, 26th March 2010, lot 1099.

The pronounced lotus flower knop may have been inspired by jade carvings which originated in Hindustan in the Mughal periods and introduced into China from the middle of Qianlong's reign. While Mughal jades are characterised by thinly-carved walls and florid designs, the present censer is deeply rooted in archaic Chinese traditions as well as retaining the weightiness of the body in appreciation of the highly valued medium. Censers with related lotus knops include one sold in our London rooms, 29th November 1977, lot 280; and another sold at Christie's London, 7th April 1982, lot 334.

中國瓷器及工藝品

|
香港