1918
1918

PROPERTY OF A LADY

A RARE BLUE AND WHITE EWER
MING DYNASTY, YONGLE PERIOD
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1918

PROPERTY OF A LADY

A RARE BLUE AND WHITE EWER
MING DYNASTY, YONGLE PERIOD
前往

拍品詳情

中國瓷器及工藝品

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香港

A RARE BLUE AND WHITE EWER
MING DYNASTY, YONGLE PERIOD
based on a Persian metal form, supported on a low foot, the pear-shaped body painted in vibrant colbalt-blue tones on each side with a quadrifoliate cartouche enclosing a fruiting sprig of peaches or loquats, surrounded by flowering and leafy scrolls of chrysanthemum, peony, rose and camellia, all below a tapering neck with a band of lotus scroll, rising to a flaring mouth collared with upright plantain leaves, set with an elegant curved handle decorated with lingzhi sprays, surmounted by an eyelet above three moulded bosses simulating pegs, the shapely spout secured to the body by a cloud-shaped strut
26.5 cm., 10 1/2 in.
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來源

Collection of a ship-building family, Northern England.
An English Private Collection.
Sotheby's London, 8th November 2006, lot 27.

相關資料

This fine ewer epitomises the classic Yongle blue and white style that became the blueprint for porcelain decoration throughout the Ming dynasty. It represents one of the finest wares made in the Imperial kilns at Jingdezhen in the early Ming period. The shaped panel containing a peach and loquat and the surrounding 'Flowers of the Four Seasons' (rose, peony, chrysanthemum and camellia) are executed in a particularly naturalistic and vigorous fashion through bold and dark lines. However the washes of shading and finely detailed foliage also create a sense of delicate sensitivity in the auspicious motifs.

A closely related ewer from the Qing Court collection and still in Beijing is illustrated in The Complete Collection of Treasures of the Palace Museum. Blue and White Porcelain with Underglazed Red (I), Shanghai, 2000, pl. 41, together with a related example attributed to the Xuande reign, pl. 114, and another with a Xuande reign mark and of the period, pl. 115. Two further ewers of this type are illustrated in Regina Krahl, Chinese Ceramics in the Topkapi Saray Museum, Istanbul, vol. 2, London, 1986, pl. 618, both repaired with Islamic metal mounts; two damaged examples, from the Ardebil Shrine and now in the National Museum of Iran in Teheran, are published in John Alexander Pope, Chinese Porcelains from the Ardebil Shrine, Washington D.C., 1956, pl. 54 (top left), and in Misugi Takatoshi, Chinese Porcelain Collections in the Near East. Topkapi and Ardebil, vol. 3, Hong Kong, 1981, pl. A78; and another in the Museum of Chinese History, Beijing, is included in Zhongguo taoci quanji, vol. 12, Shanghai, 2000, pl. 15. Compare a similar ewer sold in our Hong Kong rooms, 27th April 2003, lot 213; another sold at Christie's Hong Kong, 7th July 2003, lot 643; and a third example sold at Christie's London, 13th November 2001, lot 119.

A fragmentary ewer of this type but with the panels reserved, excavated from the waste heaps of the Jingdezhen kiln site in Zhushan, was included in the exhibition Imperial Hongwu and Yongle Porcelain Excavated at Jingdezhen, Chang Foundation, Taipei, 1996, cat. no. 59.

The Four Flowers of the Four Seasons represent the wish for wealth and honour throughout the year. These flowers represent the four seasons: the spring peony, the summer rose, the autumn camellia and the winter chrysanthemum.

中國瓷器及工藝品

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香港