196
196

PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE COLLECTOR

Michele Tosini, called Michele di Ridolfo del Ghirlandaio
SAINT MARY MAGDALENE
Stima
100.000150.000
Lotto. Venduto 146,500 USD (Prezzo di aggiudicazione con commissione d'acquisto)
VAI AL LOTTO
196

PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE COLLECTOR

Michele Tosini, called Michele di Ridolfo del Ghirlandaio
SAINT MARY MAGDALENE
Stima
100.000150.000
Lotto. Venduto 146,500 USD (Prezzo di aggiudicazione con commissione d'acquisto)
VAI AL LOTTO

Details & Cataloguing

Important Old Master Paintings and Sculpture

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New York

Michele Tosini, called Michele di Ridolfo del Ghirlandaio
FLORENCE 1503 - 1577
SAINT MARY MAGDALENE

Provenienza(e)

With Colnaghi, New York, 1988;
From whom acquired by a Private Collector;
From whom purchased by the present collector, by 1989.

Esposizione

New York, Colnaghi, Gothic to Renaissance:  European Painting 1300-1600, 1988, no. 17;
New  York, Richard L. Feigen & Co., Strange Beauty:  A Century of Mannerism 1520-1620, 29 January - 2 April 1999 (on loan from the present collector).

Bibliografia

L. Rivelli, Polidoro a San Silvestro al Quirinale, Bergamo 1987, p. 79, reproduced fig. 59.

Nota a catalogo

Michele Tosini began his artistic training in Florence with Lorenzo di Credi and Antonio del Ceraiolo, and later entered the workshop of Ridolfo Ghirlandaio.  By the mid-1520s, the two were frequent collaborators, and Tosini adopted the older artist's name.  By the 1540s Tosini had abandoned his earlier High Renaissance style in favour of a Mannerist idiom inspired by Bronzino and Salviati.  During the latter part of the 1550s, he worked with Vasari on the frescoes for the Salone del Cinquecento in the Palazzo Vecchio, and adopted this artist's Michelangesque style.  In the 1560s, Tosini worked on the decoration of the city gates of Florence and the altar in the chapel at the Villa Caserotta, near San Casciano Val di Pesa. 

Typically represented either before, or at, the moment of her spiritual awakening, the solitary figure of the Magdalene was a favourite pictorial subject during the Renaissance and Mannerist periods. The present, exquisite painting depicts the worldly Mary Magdalene sumptuously attired with an elaborate jeweled headdress, her serpentine pose and alluring expression suggesting her vanity and profane sexuality.  This is Mary Magdalene the prostitute, not the humble follower of Jesus Christ, and in her depiction, there is a reflection of the prevailing atmosphere of the Medici court after the middle of the sixteenth century.  Typical of the maniera style are the bust-length format, classicizing features and antique costume, which all reveal and interest in - and knowledge of - ancient sculpture, considered an authoritative source for figural types and motifs.

This painting is related to several other works, including the figures of Leda and Lucretia in the Borghese Gallery, and another image of an Allegorical Figure in a private collection. Likely done as a collector's piece, Ravelli has pointed out that the figure of the Magdalene is likely based on Polidoro's Magdalene in St. Silvestro Quirinale, Rome (op. cit.).

Important Old Master Paintings and Sculpture

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New York