85
85
Winnerl
A RARE GOLD EARLY KEYLESS WINDING POCKET CHRONOMETER WITH THIRTY-TWO HOUR POWER RESERVE INDICATION CIRCA 1845, NO.433
ACCÉDER AU LOT
85
Winnerl
A RARE GOLD EARLY KEYLESS WINDING POCKET CHRONOMETER WITH THIRTY-TWO HOUR POWER RESERVE INDICATION CIRCA 1845, NO.433
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Masterworks of Time: Adolf Lange, The Golden Era of Glashütte

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Genève

Winnerl
A RARE GOLD EARLY KEYLESS WINDING POCKET CHRONOMETER WITH THIRTY-TWO HOUR POWER RESERVE INDICATION CIRCA 1845, NO.433
Movement: gilded three-quarter plate, spring detent escapement, free-sprung bi-metallic compensation balance with timing screws and gold asymmetric poising weights, blued steel helical spring with terminal curves, diamond endstone, fusee and chain with maintaining power, cylindrical pillars, signed and numbered Winnerl, no.433
Dial: white enamel, Roman numerals, sector for 32-hour power reserve, subsidiary seconds, outer minute ring, signed Winnerl no.433
Case: gold, engine turned back centred with engraved monogram 'CM', engine turned bezels and band, pusher beside pendant for engaging crown winding, gold cuvette, case and cuvette each with maker's mark JP for Jules Perot and numbered 433 with a W above, additionally numbered 665 with a P beneath
diameter 47mm
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Provenance

Antiquorum Geneva, 23 October 1999, lot 41

Description

Joseph-Tadeus Winnerl (1799-1886) was born in Styria, Austria. After a time spent in the employ of Johann Heinrich Kessels in Altona, Winnerl travelled to Copenhagen where he worked for Urban Jürgensen between 1827 and 1829. It has been said that a few days after his arrival, Urban addressed Winnerl saying: "you have deceived me! Yes, you've deceived me! I asked you if you were competent and you just evaded the question. Now, in eleven days, you have produced better work than any of my craftsmen. From now on your are in my employ" (see: J. Knudsen, The Jürgensen Dynasty, ACC 2013, p.130). Upon leaving Jürgensen in 1829, Winnerl settled in Paris and for a period worked for Breguet. Adolph Lange served as Winnerl's apprentice for four years before returning to Dresden in 1841 (see op. cit.).

Winnerl was especially renowned for his chronometers which were admired for their 'simplified' construction; this allowed them to be produced economically and in direct competition to those of the English. At the 1837 Société d'Encouragement pour l'Industrie Nationale, Winnnerl's chronometers earnt him a gold medal, he received a further gold medal for his chronometers and a constant force clock escapement at the 1839 Exposition des Produits de l'industrie Française. Winnerl received the Croix de la Légion d'Honneur in 1844 and a further gold medal at the Exposition of the same year. He was appointed clockmaker to the Paris Observatory in 1850. For further information on Winnerl, see: Phillip Arnott, Constant Force Chronometer No.1 Attributed to Paul Garnier, Antiquarian Horology, No.1, Vol. 33, September 2011, p.68.

Masterworks of Time: Adolf Lange, The Golden Era of Glashütte

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Genève