6
6

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF GRACE VOGEL ALDWORTH

Paul Cézanne
ROSIER
Estimation
350 000450 000
Lot. Vendu 408,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
6

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF GRACE VOGEL ALDWORTH

Paul Cézanne
ROSIER
Estimation
350 000450 000
Lot. Vendu 408,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Evening

|
New York

Paul Cézanne
1839 - 1906
ROSIER
Watercolor and pencil on paper
15 1/2 by 11 3/4 in.
39.3 by 30 cm
Executed circa 1885-88.
Lire le rapport d'état Lire le rapport d'état

Provenance

Ambroise Vollard, Paris

Matthiesen Gallery, London

Mrs. Ralph H. Booth, Detroit (acquired from the above and thence by descent to the present owner)

Exposition

New York, Reinhardt Gallery, 1928

London, Matthiesen Gallery, A Century of French Drawings, 1938, no. 15

New York, Fine Arts Associates (Otto Gerson), 1956, no. 2

Milwaukee Art Center, An Inaugural Exhibition, 1957, no. 72

 

Bibliographie

Lionello Venturi, Cézanne, son art, son oeuvre, Paris, 1936, no. 1539, illustrated pl. 39 (as dating from 1873-77) (revised 1880-82)

John Rewald, Paul Cézanne, The Watercolors, Boston, 1983, no. 217, illustrated  

Description

In his catalogue raisonné of the artist's watercolors, John Rewald described the present work: "A meticulously drawn and colored study of a rosebush with a pink rambler rose." Executed in the 1880s, Rosier reveals Cézanne's masterful use of watercolor and pencil on paper. The artist valued this medium in comparison to oil paintings for the greater technical freedom which it allowed him. Carol Armstrong writes of his watercolors, "What is plotted in them... is the story of the artist's very process. For that process – tied up as it is with the artist's 'handwriting' and 'deformations,' his manual orchestration of the still-life arrangement, and his corporeal investment in its space – is put on display in watercolor on paper in a way that it is not in oil on canvas. In some of Cézanne's simpler watercolors, the process of designing and coloring is laid bare; in complex pieces... it submerges and then surfaces, fascinating the viewer into sharing the dialogue between eye and hand that is the very life of drawing and painting" (Carol Armstrong, Cézanne in the Studio: Still Life in Watercolors, Los Angeles, 2004, p. 4).

In the archives of Ambroise Vollard, Cézanne's dealer, Rosier is featured in photographs nos. 204 and 205.  The daughter of Mrs. Ralph H. Booth claimed in a letter to John Rewald that her mother acquired the work directly from Vollard himself.   Rewald, however, listed the provenance after Vollard as "Matthiesen Gallery, London," where it was exhibited in 1938. Since then, it has been in the same American collection for over seventy-five years.

Impressionist & Modern Art Evening

|
New York