524
524
Clemens, Samuel L.
Estimation
4 0006 000
Lot. Vendu 4,688 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
524
Clemens, Samuel L.
Estimation
4 0006 000
Lot. Vendu 4,688 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

THE JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: ARTS & SCIENCES, INCLUDING THE MARK TWAIN COLLECTION

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New York

Clemens, Samuel L.

A group of four letters regarding invitations.

Autograph letter signed ("S. L. Clemens"), 2 pages, on 30, Wellington Court, Albert Gate stationery, London, 9 March [1900], to a Mr. Lord, accepting a dinner at the Lotos Club in New York. Together with: A silver gelatin photograph of Clemens seated in a chair holding a book, by Pach Brothers, New York. — Autograph letter signed ("S.L. Clemens"), 2 pages, New York, 12 December 1900, to Edmund C. Stedman, declining an invitation as he is "dead, dead, dead, tired of talking & feeding." Together with: holograph envelope. — Autograph letter signed ("S. L. Clemens"), 2 pages on Villa di Quarto stationery, Florence, 21 December 1903, to a Mr. Smith, expressing a willingness to receive J. G. Ford at the Smiths' behest; mounted on card, browned. — Autograph letter signed ("S. L. Clemens"), 3 pages on mourning stationery, New York, 7 November 1905, to Mrs. Alice Pearmain, describing his new dietary regimen and inviting her and/or her husband to stay with the Clemenses whenever they wish; 2 center fold splits.


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Description

Edmund C. Stedman was an influential critic in his day; he advised Clemens on the manuscript of Connecticut Yankee (whose "Clarence" may borrow Stedman's middle name). Around the same time he helped edit the Library of American Literature (1888–1890) in which Clemens had a stake. His son Arthur published Clemens's "The Californian's Tale" in Liber Scriptorum (1893). In  spite of the father and son's contributions to Clemens's literary career he wrote a scorching letter in June 1890 to Fred Hall, declaring that "idiotcy [sic] runs in the family" and that Hall should ignore their letters.

Boston stockbroker Sumner B. Pearmain and his wife Alice were summertime neighbors of Clemens in Dublin, New Hampshire. Clemens had just recently attended a soiree at their home in Boston in October 1905. He has just begun a diet comprised primarily of milk and crackers in preparation for a lecture tour. He remarks: "The regime will do wonders in the next 3 months; then I shall be ready to go on exhibition. You will get half of the gate-money."

THE JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: ARTS & SCIENCES, INCLUDING THE MARK TWAIN COLLECTION

|
New York