495
495

PROPERTY FROM A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION

A gold snuff box representing a triple coronation, probably Brazil, circa 1834
Estimation
5 0007 000
Lot. Vendu 13,750 GBP (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
495

PROPERTY FROM A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION

A gold snuff box representing a triple coronation, probably Brazil, circa 1834
Estimation
5 0007 000
Lot. Vendu 13,750 GBP (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Style: European Silver, Ceramics, and Objects of Vertu

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Londres

A gold snuff box representing a triple coronation, probably Brazil, circa 1834
rectangular, the lid die-stamped with a scene representing Pedro I, King of Portugal, his son, Pedro, Crown Prince of Brazil and his daughter, Maria I, Queen of Portugal, in an interior flanked by columns, the imperial throne to the left on a textured ground, the angled sides and base chased with scrollwork and flowers, raised thumbpiece, maker's mark LTM in a rectangle
8cm., 3 1/8 in. wide
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Description

This interesting box depicts an allegorical scene, possibly based on a print, with Dom Pedro of Braganza, King of Portugal and Emperor of Brazil (1798-1834) crowning his son Pedro (1825-1891), as Crown Prince of Brazil (future Emperor Pedro II) and his daughter, Maria (1819-1853) as Queen Maria I of Portugal, effectively separating Brazil from Portugal. Overseeing the scene and crowning Dom Pedro with a crown of stars is Nuno Álvares Pereira, spiritual father of the House of Braganza. Nuno Álvares Pereira (1360-1431) was the father of the first Duchess of Braganza, heir to his huge estates, given by king Dom João I for his support in the fight against the King of Castile. To the left of the scene is the imperial throne with the new Brazilian arms and cypher for Pedro I. Based on Charles Percier’s design for Napoleon I’s throne, made by Georges Jacob, it is likely that the imperial throne was ordered from Jacob-Desmalter, in light of the numerous furniture commissions (which included several thrones) from Rio de Janeiro made by the previous ruler, Dom João, and also by his son, Dom Pedro.

Two further boxes set with panels die-stamped with the same subject are recorded: the first, now in the Museu Imperial de Petropolis, Rio de Janeiro, is illustrated by Humberto M. Franceschi, O Oficio da Prata no Brasil, 1988, p. 250; the second was sold, Began Antiguidades, Sao Paulo, 10 September 2018, lot 83. It is probable, given the allegorical nature of the subject, that the boxes were created to commemorate the reign of Pedro I following his death in 1834.

Style: European Silver, Ceramics, and Objects of Vertu

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Londres