495
495

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF JOSEPH STASHKEVETCH

Jim Hodges
UNTITLED
Estimation
300 000400 000
ACCÉDER AU LOT
495

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF JOSEPH STASHKEVETCH

Jim Hodges
UNTITLED
Estimation
300 000400 000
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Contemporary Art Day Auction

|
New York

Jim Hodges
B. 1957
UNTITLED
silk with white brass chain
44 by 17 in. 111.8 by 43.2 cm.
Executed in 1994.
Lire le rapport d'état Lire le rapport d'état

This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed and dated 6/4/15 by the artist.

Provenance

Gift of the artist to the present owner in 1994

Description

"Enticement and trapping, reflection and adornment, community and isolation: all of these are elements in Hodges’ emotional alchemy…Hodges dramatizes the poignant moments in which our hopes and desires lead us to the ambiguous embrace of the tenderest traps.”

Nayland Blake in Exh. Cat., New York, CRG Gallery, 1991, 1992: Jim Hodges, 2007, p. 33

In Jim Hodges’ exquisite Untitled from 1994, the artist has interlaced a delicate web of brass chains within a diaphanous silk scarf. Hodges stages a conceptual collision between the fragility of the scarf and the strength of the machine-made metallic media woven within it. Together, the gossamer scarf and shimmering web allude to the delicacy and interdependence of human relationships—appreciating their beauty while also acknowledging our own vulnerability within their grasp. 

Like his friend and peer Félix González-Torres, Hodges’ work explores the warmth of humanity juxtaposed against the loneliness of isolation. Both artists came of age in the early 1990s, when New York’s creative community was dealing with the devastation of the AIDS crisis. Hodges typically works in domestic, unconventional materials, from paper napkins to glass, and his meticulous, labor-intensive process imbues his installations with a visual poetry attuned to the undeniable temporality of craft. In the present work, the brilliantly vivid veil—transparent, almost-liquid—invites enchantment and tactile curiosity. The intricacy speaks to Hodges' celebration of interrelations and connections, working with the incidental to express something universal. As Hodges explained in 1998, his works "attempt to talk about the bigness of things, the wonder and the greatness of all life" (the artist quoted in Dana Self, Jim Hodges: Welcome, Kansas City 1998, n.p.).

Contemporary Art Day Auction

|
New York