47
47

THE PROPERTY OF AN ENGLISH PRIVATE COLLECTOR

School of Antwerp, 2nd quarter of the 16th Century
SAINT CATHERINE, FULL-LENGTH, STANDING IN A LANDSCAPE WITH AN UNSHEATHED SWORD AND A BROKEN WHEEL; SAINT BARBARA, FULL-LENGTH, STANDING BEFORE A CHURCH, HOLDING A PEACOCK FEATHER
Estimation
250 000350 000
Lot. Vendu 272,750 GBP (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
47

THE PROPERTY OF AN ENGLISH PRIVATE COLLECTOR

School of Antwerp, 2nd quarter of the 16th Century
SAINT CATHERINE, FULL-LENGTH, STANDING IN A LANDSCAPE WITH AN UNSHEATHED SWORD AND A BROKEN WHEEL; SAINT BARBARA, FULL-LENGTH, STANDING BEFORE A CHURCH, HOLDING A PEACOCK FEATHER
Estimation
250 000350 000
Lot. Vendu 272,750 GBP (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Old Masters Evening Sale

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School of Antwerp, 2nd quarter of the 16th Century
SAINT CATHERINE, FULL-LENGTH, STANDING IN A LANDSCAPE WITH AN UNSHEATHED SWORD AND A BROKEN WHEEL; SAINT BARBARA, FULL-LENGTH, STANDING BEFORE A CHURCH, HOLDING A PEACOCK FEATHER
Quantité: 2
a pair, both oil on oak panel
each: 96.5 x 41 cm.; 38 x 16 1/8  in.
Lire le rapport d'état Lire le rapport d'état

Provenance

Fredrick William Sharon (c. 1856–1915);

By descent to his stepdaughter Florence Louise Witherspoon Breckenridge (c. 1890–1956) who married in 1909 Sir Thomas Fermor-Hesketh, 8th Bt, later 1st Baron Hesketh (1881–1944);

Thence by descent to his son Frederick Fermor-Hesketh, 2nd Baron Hesketh (1916–1955);

By whose trustees sold ('The Property of The Trustees of Frederick, 2nd Baron Hesketh, deceased'), London, Sotheby's, 3 December 2008, lot 2, where acquired by the mother of the present owner;

Thence by inheritance.

Exposition

Manchester, City of Manchester Art Galleries, Art Treasures Centenary Exhibition, 1957, nos 25 and 38 (as Jan Gossaert);

Brussels, Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts, Le Siècle de Brueghel, 27 September – 24 November 1963, no. 106.

Bibliographie

Phillips & MacConnal, 25 Castle Street, Liverpool, Inventory of the Contents of Easton Neston House, Northamptonshire, 1919, no. 10, 'Two XV Century Flemish panels of Saints, oil painting £750';

Anon compiler, An Inventory of the mansion and contents, Easton Neston House, Towcester, typed document, January 1923, 'Entrance Hall 1. Two XV century Flemish panels of Saints, oil paintings, £750';

Archibald Phillips, 16 Conduit Street, London, W1, Inventory and Valuation of the Household Furniture, Overmantel Effects, Pictures and other items at Easton Neston House, Towcester, Northants, February 1927, typed document (Family Archive), p. 8, Entrance Hall, no. 1, 'Two Flemish panels of Saints, £750';

Anon compiler, An Inventory of the Mansion and Contents, Easton Neston House, Towcester, February 1927, typed document (Family Archive), Drawing Room, no. 10, 'Two XV Century Flemish Panels of Saints, £750';

E.K. Waterhouse, in Catalogue of the Exhibition, European Old Masters, Manchester 1957, p. 7 (as Jan Gossaert);

Illustrated London News, 2 January 1960, supplement;

L. van Puyvelde et al., Le Siècle de Brueghel, exh. cat., Brussels 1963, p. 101, cat. no. 106, reproduced figs 67a and 67b (as Jan Gossaert).

Description

These altar wings depicting Saints Catherine and Barbara were attributed to Jan Gossaert by both Ellis Waterhouse and Leo van Puyvelde at the 1957 Manchester and 1963 Brussels exhibitions respectively. Today, however, scholars have unanimously rejected the attribution to Gossaert but do agree that the panels were executed in Antwerp, probably in the 1520s or possibly the early 1530s, showing stylistic similarites to both the Master of Frankfurt and the Master of the Female Half-Lengths. Although their provenance before circa 1900 is not known, they were clearly the left and right hanging wings of a triptych, a notion supported by the traces of hinges found at the right margin of the former and the left margin of the latter.

Note on Provenance
The panels are first recorded in the Drawing Room of Frederick William Sharon's New York residence, circa 1900 (Fig.1). Frederick was the only son of William Sharon (1821–1885) who initially made his fortune as a lawyer and merchant during the California gold rush of the 1840s and 50s. He later co-founded the Bank of California with William Ralston and served as Senator in the 1870s. William Sharon had three children and it is possible these paintings were first acquired by him and entered the Fermor-Hesketh collection via his younger daughter, Florence Emily Sharon (1858–1924), who married Sir Thomas George Fermor-Hesketh, 7th Bt (1849–1924). It seems however more likely that they were acquired by Frederick William Sharon and passed to his stepdaughter, Florence Louise Witherspoon Breckenridge (c. 1890–1956), who married her step cousin Thomas Fermor-Hesketh (1881–1944) in 1909.

The younger Fermor-Heskeths first established themselves at no. 7 Rutland Gate, London and Rufford New Hall, Lancashire. In 1912, Sir Thomas George handed over the family's principal seat, Easton Neston in Northamptonshire, to his son who was M.P. for Enfield and  later ennobled for services to the Conservative Party, becoming Baron Hesketh in 1935. The panels hung in the Entrance Hall at Easton Neston until May 2005.

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