46
46
[Arizona]
CAMP APACHE, ARIZONA, 1876. [CAMP APACHE, ARIZONA]: AUGUST 5, 1876 
Estimation
6 0008 000
Lot. Vendu 7,500 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
46
[Arizona]
CAMP APACHE, ARIZONA, 1876. [CAMP APACHE, ARIZONA]: AUGUST 5, 1876 
Estimation
6 0008 000
Lot. Vendu 7,500 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Printed and Manuscript Americana, Including Cartography

|
New York

[Arizona]
CAMP APACHE, ARIZONA, 1876. [CAMP APACHE, ARIZONA]: AUGUST 5, 1876 
Watercolor on paper (image size: 16 1/4 x 21 in.; 413 x 533 mm; sheet size: 20 x 25 in.; 508 x 635 mm), gray watercolor, highlighted with red, white, and blue watercolor, on paper, titled in block letters in the lower margin, signed and dated lower mid-left image “G. Anderson | Aug. 5th 1876”. PROVENANCE: Kennedy Galleries (labels) — Collection of Edward Eberstadt & Sons

Three short marginal tears expertly repaired.


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Bibliographie

Howard R. Lamar (editor), New Encyclopedia of the American West p.39

Description

A FINE HISTORICAL GRAPHIC RECORD OF ONE OF THE MOST STORIED OF WESTERN FORTS.

The Indian fighter General George Crook and his Apache Scouts (pacified Apaches who wore U.S. Army uniforms) operated from the base, attempting to control the marauding attacks. The fort was originally built in 1870 as Camp Ord under the supervision of Brevet Colonel John Green of the U.S. 1st Cavalry and renamed several times, it was not until 1879 that the post was finally called Fort Apache.

In 1869, Green explained the strategic reasons for establishing the camp: “I have selected a site for a military post on the White Mountain River which is the finest I ever saw. The climate is delicious, and said by the Indians to be perfectly healthy, free from all malaria. Excellently well wooded and watered. It seems as though this one corner of Arizona were almost its garden spot, the beauty of its scenery, the fertility of its soil and facilities for irrigation are not surpassed by any place that ever came under my observation. Building material of fine pine timber is available within eight miles of this site. There is also plenty of limestone within a reasonable distance. This post would be of the greatest advantage for the following reasons: It would compel the White Mountain Indians to live on their reservation or be driven from their beautiful country which they almost worship. It would stop their traffic in corn with the hostile tribes, they could not plant an acre of ground without our permission as we know every spot of it. It would make a good scouting post, being adjacent to hostile bands on either side. Also a good supply depot for Scouting expeditions from other posts, and in fact, I believe, would do more to end the Apache War than anything else.”

Fine Printed and Manuscript Americana, Including Cartography

|
New York