3320
3320
A CELADON JADE FIGURE OF A BIXIE
SIX DYNASTIES
Estimation
1 800 0002 800 000
ACCÉDER AU LOT
3320
A CELADON JADE FIGURE OF A BIXIE
SIX DYNASTIES
Estimation
1 800 0002 800 000
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Beasts of Antiquity – Important Jade Animals from the Chang Shou Studio

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Hong Kong

A CELADON JADE FIGURE OF A BIXIE
SIX DYNASTIES
depicted crouching with outstretched front paws, the mythical beast portrayed with a broad and slightly agape mouth revealing its fangs and teeth below a pair of long slender horns, further rendered with a pair of wings extending from the shoulders and along the body, the well-defined muscular haunches detailed with a curling tail with rope-twist grooves, the stone of a pale greyish-celadon colour highlighted with celadon and black patches and streaks
6.2 cm, 2 1/2  in.
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Provenance

The Hei-Chi Collection.

Exposition

Jade in Chinese Culture, Palm Springs Desert Museum, Palm Springs, CA, 1990, cat. no. 27.
Ip Yee, Chinese Jade Carving, Hong Kong Museum of Art, Hong Kong, 1983, cat. no. 126.
Chinese Jade Animals, Hong Kong Museum of Art, Hong Kong, 1996, cat. no. 58.

Bibliographie

Jiang Tao and Liu Yunhui, Jades from the Hei-Chi Collection, Beijing, 2006, p. 132 top.

Description

Skilfully modelled in the round to depict a playful bixie, portrayed through its animated face and charming paws, this carving successfully captures a sense of life. The curling eyebrows and the gentle crouching position of this creature evoke a child-like spirit, poised ready for play. These figural sculptures were created as independent objects for the sumptuous display and enjoyment of its owner, as well as to provide a constant and concrete realisation of the powerful supernatural forces latent in the world. Compare a carving of this type and attributed to the Six Dynasties, in the Palace Museum, Beijing, illustrated in Zhongguo yuqi quanji, vol. 4, Shijiazhuang, 1993, pl. 306; and another, but with wings, from the collection of Arthur Sackler, included in the Oriental Ceramic Society exhibition Chinese Jade Throughout the Ages, Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 1975, cat. no. 182.

Carvings of this type continued to be produced in the later periods; for example see a yellow jade example attributed to the Song to Ming dynasty, from the Bei Shan Tang Collection, included in the exhibition Chinese Jade Carving, Hong Kong Museum of Art, Hong Kong, 1983, cat. no. 147; and a Ming example, from the collection of Mr and Mrs Philip Pinsof, also included in the Oriental Ceramic Society exhibition Chinese Jade Throughout the Ages, op. cit., cat. no. 376.

The popularity of the representation of mythical creatures in stone to line the tomb avenues of emperors and high-ranking officials reached a peak during the Six Dynasties. Concurrent with the creation of immense fabulous beasts from the spiritual world were produced on a grand scale outside the tombs near Nanjing, an artistic tradition of creating jade animals in the highest quality flourished.

Beasts of Antiquity – Important Jade Animals from the Chang Shou Studio

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Hong Kong