3053
3053
A CLOISONNE VASE, HU
CAST MARK AND PERIOD OF QIANLONG
Estimation
1 800 0002 500 000
ACCÉDER AU LOT
3053
A CLOISONNE VASE, HU
CAST MARK AND PERIOD OF QIANLONG
Estimation
1 800 0002 500 000
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art

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Hong Kong

A CLOISONNE VASE, HU
CAST MARK AND PERIOD OF QIANLONG
the pear-shaped body supported on a short splayed foot, rising to a slightly waisted neck and a flanged rim, set with two tubular lug handles joined by two raised gilt-bronze fillets, finely enamelled on each side with a large multi-coloured lotus flower wreathed by curling foliage shaded in tones of green and tendrils issuing further buds and yellow and white blossoms, all reserved on a bright turquoise ground, the lug handles picked out with floret sprays against a dark purplish-blue ground, the rims and the base set in gilt, the latter cast with a four-character reign mark in positive script within a recessed panel
18.3 cm., 7 1/4  in.
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Provenance

A French aristocratic collection.
Sotheby's Paris, 6th December 2007, lot 84.

Description

It is interesting to note the depiction and subtle synthesis of the traditional with the innovative on this charming vase. The form is based on the archaic bronze hu ritual vessel, a form that was revived in ceramic wares during the Song period. While the overall symmetrical composition and floral blooms are rendered in the typical Ming style, the curling foliage does not follow the more simplified and robust vines found on Ming vessels. The depiction of leaves and ‘C’ scrolls on the present vase is more closely related to European Baroque foliate scrolls that gained popularity in the Qing court.

Compare Qianlong vases of this type, but with varying handles, such as one offered in these rooms, 11th April 2008, lot 2810; and a larger pair said to have been made as part of a set of tableware used by the Qianlong Emperor for formal banquets, illustrated in Chuimei Ho and Bennet Bronson, Splendors of China’s Forbidden City. The Glorious Reign of Emperor Qianlong, London, 2004, pl. 244.

Fine Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art

|
Hong Kong