3032
3032
A SUPERB 'LONGQUAN' CELADON BOTTLE VASE, YUHUCHUNPING
YUAN DYNASTY
Estimation
1 500 0002 000 000
Lot. Vendu 2,740,000 HKD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
3032
A SUPERB 'LONGQUAN' CELADON BOTTLE VASE, YUHUCHUNPING
YUAN DYNASTY
Estimation
1 500 0002 000 000
Lot. Vendu 2,740,000 HKD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Curiosity III

|
Hong Kong

A SUPERB 'LONGQUAN' CELADON BOTTLE VASE, YUHUCHUNPING
YUAN DYNASTY
the elegantly proportioned pear-shaped body rising from a splayed foot, sweeping up to a tall waisted neck and an everted rim, covered overall in an even sea-green glaze thinning at the rim, save for the unglazed footring fired to a buff-orange tone
25.8 cm, 10 1/8  in.
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Provenance

A Japanese private collection, by repute.

Description

Notable for its fine potting and rich celadon glaze, this elegant vase displays the Longquan potter’s continued efforts in the Yuan dynasty to attain pure glazes and refined shapes. With the unification of China under Mongol rule in the 13th century and subsequent intensification of trade exchanges with the rest of Asia, the potters at Longquan in Zhejiang province quickly adapted their repertoire of shapes and designs to the aesthetic taste of the new dynasty. In stark contrast to the large and profusely decorated vessels characteristic of this period, a small number of delicately potted and undecorated pieces such as the present piece were made. These closely followed those of the preceding dynasty, such as the vase from the Charles B. Hoyt Collection, in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, illustrated in Basil Gray, Sung Porcelain & Stoneware, London, 1984, pl. 141.

Longquan yuhuchunping of this attractive shape and fine glaze are rare, although a vase of similar form and size but fashioned with a subtly stepped foot, was excavated from a hoard at Sunpingcun, Taishun county, Zhejiang province, and illustrated in Zhu Boqian, ed., Celadons from Longquan Kilns, Taipei, 1998, pl. 160. Three further excavated examples are published in The Complete Works of Chinese Ceramics, vol. 10, Shanghai, 2000, pls 27, 28 and 30; and a slightly larger vase is illustrated in Sekai toji zenshu/Ceramic Art of the World, vol. 13 Tokyo, 1981, pl. 174. Compare also a yuhuchunping covered in a similar glaze but with ferruginous brown spots, in the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka, included in Ataka korekushon Tōyō tōji meihin ten [Oriental ceramics from the Ataka Collection], Tokyo, 1978, cat. no. 50, and again illustrated in Ye Peilan, Yuandai ciqi [Yuan dynasty porcelain], Beijing, 1998, pl. 499.

Yuhuchunping continued to be made at Longquan in the Ming dynasty with slight variation to the form with the globular body becoming broader and the neck less elongated. Their size also increased with most examples measuring slightly above 30 cm; see for example two undecorated yuhuchunping attributed to the Ming dynasty, included in the exhibition Green-Longquan Celadon of the Ming Dynasty, National Palace Museum, Taipei, 2002, cat. nos 49 and 50.

Curiosity III

|
Hong Kong