27
27
Ludolph de Jongh
AN INTERIOR WITH A MAID HOLDING A JUG AND THREE MEN BESIDE A FIRE
Estimation
60 00080 000
Lot. Vendu 75,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
27
Ludolph de Jongh
AN INTERIOR WITH A MAID HOLDING A JUG AND THREE MEN BESIDE A FIRE
Estimation
60 00080 000
Lot. Vendu 75,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Otto Naumann Sale

|
New York

Ludolph de Jongh
OVERSCHIE 1616 - 1679 HILLEGERSBERG
AN INTERIOR WITH A MAID HOLDING A JUG AND THREE MEN BESIDE A FIRE
signed and dated center right, above the door: L.D. Jongh/Ao.1668
oil on panel
27 3/8  by 33 in.; 69.5 by 83.8 cm.
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Provenance

With Jacques Leegenhoek, Paris, by 2011;
Anonymous sale, New York, Christie's, 5 June 2013, lot 68;
Where acquired.

Description

De Jongh was a leading painter in Rotterdam and one of the most versatile painters of his time, producing portraits, landscapes, hunting scenes and genre pictures, such as the present work.  According to his biographer, Arnold Houbraken, he studied with Cornelis Saftleven in Rotterdam, Anthonie Palamedesz. in Delft, and Jan van Bijlert in Utrecht, after which he spent a seven year sojourn in France before returning to Rotterdam in 1643.  He quickly established himself as one of that city’s most important painters, exerting a strong influence on such younger artists as Pieter de Hooch and Jacob Ochtervelt.

Though there is a scarcity of signed works by De Jongh, this painting is prominently signed and dated 1668, making it an important work in determining the artist’s artistic evolution. Lighter in tonality than his earlier interiors, the composition is punctuated throughout by the bright reds of the figures’ various garments and the curtains at left.  The setting appears to be the interior of a tavern or inn, with figures gathered near a blazing fire.  A young maid stands at center holding a jug in her right hand, her left hand on her hip.  She does not interact with the three male figures, but directs her gaze towards the empty chair at left.  An older man seated at center looks out knowingly at the viewer as he lifts his glass, while in the background a grinning young man emerges from a back room with his shirt untucked, implying  that likely more than just drinking by the fire is going on.  In spite of the merrymaking under way, there may be a moralizing message implied by the bunch of turnips depicted at lower right.  In Netherlandish prints and literature of the period a pun was made on the Dutch word for turnip (raap) and the verb to scrounge (rapen), and turnips were sometimes used to signify greedy or distasteful behavior.1

Infrared reflectography of this painting reveals changes made to the lower left quadrant of the painting, in the area where the figure of the maid is gazing (fig. 1). The outlines of a jug and broom can be seen in the extreme lower left corner, and a draped table with the carcass of a duck, its head hanging limply over the near side of the table, can be seen where the chair is now positioned.

1.  W. Gibson, Figures of speech: picturing proverbs in renaissance Netherlands, Berkeley 2010, pp. 59-60, 74-77.

The Otto Naumann Sale

|
New York