26
26
A VERY RARE MINIATURE SILVER AND GILT-BRONZE TRIPOD VESSEL (HU)
HAN DYNASTY
Estimation
120 000150 000
Lot. Vendu 149,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
26
A VERY RARE MINIATURE SILVER AND GILT-BRONZE TRIPOD VESSEL (HU)
HAN DYNASTY
Estimation
120 000150 000
Lot. Vendu 149,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art

|
New York

A VERY RARE MINIATURE SILVER AND GILT-BRONZE TRIPOD VESSEL (HU)
HAN DYNASTY
of compressed spherical form supported on three bear-form feet, the sides set with opposing loop handles suspending rings, finely gilt with a turtledove and beast amidst cloud scrolls forming the main register around the steeply rounded sides below a narrow gilt band, the neck decorated with a frieze of triangular motifs underneath another narrow gilt band, the cover surmounted with a ringed loop finial, decorated with gilt floral patterns, all outlined by engravings and reserved on a silver-gilt ground
Height 2 1/4  in., 5.6 cm
Lire le rapport d'état Lire le rapport d'état

Provenance

A Japanese collection prior to 1980.

Description

This rare miniature hu vessel exemplifies the highly skilled gilding and incising techniques developed in the Han dynasty. The rich ornamentation expresses a scene of the Daoist mystic realm populated with turtledoves and animals amidst cloud scrolls. The cloud scroll was an often used background pattern in the Han dynasty, which created the atmosphere of the Daoist land of immortality. In the Han dynasty, according to Fan Ye's History of the Later Han Dynasty (Hou Han shu li yiji), published in China in the fifth century, the turtledove was a symbol of longevity as it was known that the bird that would not choke. There are many surviving examples of Han bronze turtledove finials which were originally attached to the wangzhang, a rod given by the Emperor to people who were older than 70. The Daoist theme on this present vessel is further emphasized by its bear-form legs. The bear was another popular motif in Han iconography and often related to stories found in the Shanhaijing. A small Han bronze tripod vessel with incised decoration of slightly different form is illustrated in Ancient Chinese Bronzes, J.J. Lally & Co., 2011, no.10; compare also a gilt and incised incense burner in the Nanjing Museum illustrated in Zhongguo wenwu jinghua dacidian: qing tong juan (Grand Dictionary of Gems of Chinese Cultural Relics: Bronzes), Shanghai, 1995, p. 322, no. 1155.

Fine Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art

|
New York