235
235
Magdalene Odundo
UNTITLED (VESSEL)
Estimation
30 00050 000
Lot. Vendu 75,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
235
Magdalene Odundo
UNTITLED (VESSEL)
Estimation
30 00050 000
Lot. Vendu 75,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Design

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New York

Magdalene Odundo
UNTITLED (VESSEL)
incised Odundo/1987
burnished and carbonized terracotta
12 in. (30.5 cm) high
8 1/2  in. (21.6 cm) diameter
1987
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Provenance

Queensberry Hunt Design, London, circa late 1980s

Bibliographie

David Queensberry, Magdalene Odundo, London, 1991, p. 12 (for a related example)
Joris Picton, et al., Magdalene Odundo, exh. cat,  Het Kruithuis, Stedelijk Museum voor Hedengaase Kunst, ‘s-Hertogenbosch, 1994, p. 35 (for a related example)
Anthony Slayter-Ralph, ed., Magdalene Odundo, London, 2004, p. 43 (for a related form)

Description

Sotheby's would like to thank Magdalene Odundo and Anthony Slayter-Ralph for their assistance with the cataloguing of this lot.

Much of the work of England-based ceramist Magdalene Odundo bears the influence of ceramic traditions from her native Kenya.  Her striking, voluptuous clay pots, typically made with a stylized, wide-mouthed neck, are infused with an array of cross-cultural and historical meaning.  This is most apparent in Odundo’s technique: she does not use a wheel and instead favors a coiling technique, which allows her to hand build each piece and thus permits more formalistic flexibility.  In her own words, she is “attracted to something that is almost a kind of electricity in how pliable the body can be. With plastic clay, while it is capable of being shaped to capture that mesmerizing, hypnotic achievement, the pot ends up in a motionless state. That is what I try to capture.”  Similarly, Odundo does not glaze her vessels but instead laboriously burnishes the pieces repeatedly, a method used commonly by sub-Saharan potters.  The dazzling black finish found in many of her late 1980s pieces are created by adding wood and wood shavings into the kiln with the pots, which produces a thick black smoke that fuses with the external sides of the fired piece and results in a mesmerizing and highly textured surface.  The present lot is exemplary of the artist's unique aesthetic and technique.

Important Design

|
New York