192
192
AN ALBUM OF ‘YIXING STONEWARES’ RUBBINGS
LATE QING DYNASTY
Estimation
120 000150 000
Lot. Vendu 275,000 HKD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
192
AN ALBUM OF ‘YIXING STONEWARES’ RUBBINGS
LATE QING DYNASTY
Estimation
120 000150 000
Lot. Vendu 275,000 HKD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Water, Pine and Stone Retreat Collection, Scholarly Art III

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Hong Kong

AN ALBUM OF ‘YIXING STONEWARES’ RUBBINGS
LATE QING DYNASTY
ink on paper, with 14 double leaves, the first inscribed with two colophons, both in running script, the first signed Changbai Shanren Yanyu, impressed with six seals, the second with three, followed by rubbings of various Yixing wares, bearing a total of five seals, each leaf mounted in silk, between brocade-wrapped covers, the title panel inscribed in seal script zisha jing tuo ('fine rubbings of purple sand [stonewares]')
each individual leaf 25.3 by 70 cm., 10 by 28 in.
Lire le rapport d'état Lire le rapport d'état

Provenance

Collection of Manshu Zhenjun (1857-1920), also known as Tang Yan after 1911.
Collection of Aisin Gioro Zhaoyuan, 2002.
Sydney L. Moss Ltd., London, May 2006.

Description

A related album, containing rubbings of Yixing teapots, which include some of the same pieces and even arranged in a similar unusual asymmetrical manner as that seen here, was included in the exhibition The Art of Chen Hongshou, Painting, Calligraphy, Seal-Carving and Teapot-Design, The Art Museum, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 2005, cat. no. 4.1-4.8.

The introduction to the present album may be translated as follows:

The purple-sand type of Yixing pots began in the Northern Song Dynasty, but reached a florescence in the Southern Song. By the end of the Yuan Dynasty, there had already appeared a technique for etching inscriptions on these pots. And in the Ming Dynasty, the development of purple-sand pots had reached its ultimate ‘high tide.’ Among great masters of that time, most celebrated is Gongchun, the sole name to be transmitted from that era. There is a tradition that one small pot by Gongchun, after several decades of use, would reach a value of one bar of gold.

With the early Qing, there further appeared such great masters as Shi Dabin, Li Zhongfang and Xu Yuquan.During the years of the Kangxi through the Qianlong periods, the forms of the pots evolved from the ‘tendon-pattern’ type to natural forms. Among the great masters of this period one must include Chen Mingyuan and, slightly later than him, Chen Hongshou and Yang Pengnian collaborated on pots whose construction of forms, techniques for delineating pictures, and etching of inscriptions all melded together into a whole. The people of the time called these ‘Mansheng Pots,’ and at the time, there was a theory to the effect that there were Eighteen Forms of Mansheng Pots. The bottoms of these pots would for the most part be inscribed with the four characters A Man to shi and there would also be a seal of the characters Mansheng [Chen’s hao], or a seal of the two characters, Pengnian. A small number of them also employ a seal reading Sanglienli guan  (Studio of the Interlocking Mulberry Trees).

During the same time, other famed masters included Shao Daheng, Zhu Shimei and Qu Ziye, whose names resonated throughout the period.

The present album is designed to supplement the deficiency of materials available for the history of purple-sand pots, and I have thus collected here rubbings of examples merely to make up for the insufficiency of such treasures. And here I add this preface.

Inscribed by Changbai Shanren, Yanyu, with four seals of the artist.

Water, Pine and Stone Retreat Collection, Scholarly Art III

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Hong Kong