185
185
Foullon, Abel (1513-1563/1565)
USAIGE ET DESCRIPTION DE L’HOLOMETRE. POUR SCAVOIR MESURER TOUTES CHOSES. PARIS: PIERRE BEGUIN, 1555, FIRST EDITION
Estimation
7 0009 000
Lot. Vendu 11,875 GBP (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
185
Foullon, Abel (1513-1563/1565)
USAIGE ET DESCRIPTION DE L’HOLOMETRE. POUR SCAVOIR MESURER TOUTES CHOSES. PARIS: PIERRE BEGUIN, 1555, FIRST EDITION
Estimation
7 0009 000
Lot. Vendu 11,875 GBP (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

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Foullon, Abel (1513-1563/1565)
USAIGE ET DESCRIPTION DE L’HOLOMETRE. POUR SCAVOIR MESURER TOUTES CHOSES. PARIS: PIERRE BEGUIN, 1555, FIRST EDITION
Fine, Oronce. La composition et usage du quarre geometrique, par lequel on peut mesurer fidelement toutes longeurs, hauteurs, & profunditez. Paris: Gilles Gourbin, 1556

2 works in one volume, 4to (215 x 155mm.), woodcut illustrations in both works, some full-page, a few woodcut diagrams, first work with final blank leaf, eighteenth-century calf, spine gilt, title of first work somewhat soiled, a few small stains in second work, binding slightly worn (including partial loss of label)


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Provenance

bought from Martayan Lan, New York, 1989

Bibliographie

Foullon: Tomash & Williams F93; USTC 29705; Fine: Tomash & Williams F62; Hilliard & Poulle 36; USTC 89613, 29708

Description

A prolific inventor, Abel Foullon had been appointed in 1551 valet du chambre du roi in recognition of his discovery of a method for minting testons with minimal silver content. The same year he perfected his holomètre, a surveying and drawing instrument made for him by Master Pierre “Le Compassier”, and in the preface dedicated to Henri II, Foullon announces his invention of a new method of casting bronze, devices for raising water, and a self-propelled vehicle. He was awarded a royal patent on the holomètre, on condition that he publish a description of the instrument after the patent rights expired; “the resulting description of 1555 is generally thought to have been the first patent specification” (Justine Pila & Paul Torremans, European Intellectual Property Law, Oxford 2016, p.14).

The second work, a translation by Oronce Fine himself of one chapter of his Protomathesis (1532), is in its first edition. The translation had been made by Fine in 1538 for presentation to François II, but was not printed during his lifetime (the autograph manuscript, written on vellum with coloured drawings, is Paris, BnF Français 1334; see H&P 85).

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

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