181
181

PROPERTY OF AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTOR

Maximilien Luce
MONTMARTRE, DE LA RUE CORTOT, VUE VERS SAINT-DENIS
ACCÉDER AU LOT
181

PROPERTY OF AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTOR

Maximilien Luce
MONTMARTRE, DE LA RUE CORTOT, VUE VERS SAINT-DENIS
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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Londres

Maximilien Luce
1858 - 1941
MONTMARTRE, DE LA RUE CORTOT, VUE VERS SAINT-DENIS
signed Luce (lower left)
oil on canvas
40.6 by 50.2cm., 16 by 19 3/4 in.
Painted circa 1900.
Lire le rapport d'état Lire le rapport d'état

Provenance

Galerie Huinck en Scherjon, Amsterdam
Galerie René Drouet, Paris
Private Collection, Beverly Hills (acquired from the above in 1968)
Private Collection, New York (by descent from the above; sale: Sotheby's, New York, 5th November 2009, lot 110)
Purchased at the above sale by the present owner

Exposition

Amsterdam, Galerie Huinck en Scherjon, Tentoonstelling van schilderijen door Luce, Radda, Tobeen, 1932, no. 3 (titled Panorama de Paris)
Amsterdam, Galerie Huinck en Scherjob, Nederlandsche en Fransche Kunst, 1935, no. 20 (titled Panorama de Paris)
Amsterdam, Galerie Huinck en Scherjob, Fransche Kunst (19e eeuw), 1936, no. 23 (titled Panorama de Paris)
Amsterdam, Galerie Huinck en Scherjob, Nederlandsche en Fransche Kunst, 1938, no. 43

Bibliographie

Philippe Cazeau, Maximilien Luce, Paris, 1982, n.n., illustrated p. 40
Jean Bouin-Luce & Denise Bazetoux, Maximilien Luce, Catalogue de l'œuvre peint, Paris, 1986, vol. II, no. 163, illustrated p. 47

Description

In 1887, Camille Pissarro introduced Maximilien Luce to the Neo-Impressionist painters Georges Seurat, Paul Siganc and Henri Edmond Cross, which had a tremendous impact on Luce’s painting. An early practitioner of ‘pointillism’, of which pure pigments are placed directly on the canvas with short brushstrokes, Luce was less bound by the theoretical dictum of optical fusion than other members of his circle, favouring a more instinctive approach, demonstrated by the present landscape of Montmartre, de la Rue Corot, Vue vers Saint Denis. Luce, along with Camille Pissarro, broke away from the stark, unoccupied compositions of his peers, preferring to depict the dynamics of urban life instead. Luce moved to Montmartre in 1887 where he began to exhibit annually with the Neo-Impressionsts at the Salon des Artistes Independents, and in 1889 and 1892, by invitation, at the Salon des Vingt in Brussels.

Luce relished the sweeping views from the rooftops and chimneys of Montmartre, where he could capture the light as it bounced off the canopies of the trees and the red tiled roofs of the sprawling buildings. The present work includes a beautiful house on the right, in which the viewer appreciates the panoramic vision the owner would have experienced. The house was lived by Suzanne Valadon, the first woman painter to be admitted to the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts; she was also the mother of artist Maurice Utrillo.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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Londres