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177
A SOAPSTONE 'MYTHICAL BEAST' SEAL
SIGNED BANDING
REPUBLICAN PERIOD, DATED TO 1930
Estimation
30 00050 000
Lot. Vendu 212,500 HKD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
177
A SOAPSTONE 'MYTHICAL BEAST' SEAL
SIGNED BANDING
REPUBLICAN PERIOD, DATED TO 1930
Estimation
30 00050 000
Lot. Vendu 212,500 HKD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Water, Pine and Stone Retreat Collection, Scholarly Art III

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Hong Kong

A SOAPSTONE 'MYTHICAL BEAST' SEAL
SIGNED BANDING
REPUBLICAN PERIOD, DATED TO 1930
of cubic form, carved with a mythical beast, probably a xiezhi, detailed with a single horn, bulging alert eyes and flaring nostrils, standing foursquare with its head slightly tilted, its muscular body accentuated by scrolling tufts of hair on Its limbs echoing the bushy curling tail, one side incised in running script with the verse Sou jin qifeng da caogao (‘I scoured strange peaks, and an idea began to form’), followed by the date and signature Gengwu nian liu yue ershi ri, Banding (‘the twentieth day of the sixth month of the gengwu year, Banding’, corresponding to 1930), the seal face engraved with the same poetic expression in seal script, the stone of mottled vermillion-red and creamy-grey tones with natural dark veining
height 7.3 cm., 2 7/8  in.
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Description

The present finely carved seal belonged to Chen Nian, zi Jingshan and hao Banding (1877-1970), who was a native of Shaoxing in Zhejiang province. Chen was one of the prominent artists of the 20th century within the Chinese tradition of painting. In his 20s, he moved to Shanghai where he became acquainted with Ren Bonian and later became a student of Wu Changshuo, who taught him the art of painting, calligraphy and seal carving. In 1906 he moved to Beijing where he was invited by Cai Yuanpei to work in the Beijing University library. Subsequently he started teaching at the National Beiping Arts College where he was a professor of art. In the 1950s, Chen held a number of important positions, including being the vice president of the Beijing Academy of Chinese Painting, the president of the Chinese Painting Society, a council member of the Chinese Artists Association and a research fellow of the Chinese National Fine Arts Institute. As an artist, Chen was especially skilled in flower paintings and developed his own distinct style by amalgamating Ming and Qing period painting techniques into his works. He was also a connoisseur and collector of arts.

Water, Pine and Stone Retreat Collection, Scholarly Art III

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Hong Kong