169
169
Faulhaber, Johann (1580-1635)
NEWERFUNDNER GEBRAUCH EINES NIDERLÄNDISCHEN INSTRUMENTS ZUM ABMESSEN UND GRUNDLEGEN MIT SEHR GESCHWINDEM VORTHEIL ZU PRACTICIERN. AUGSBURG: DAVID FRANCK, 1610
Estimation
2 5003 000
Lot. Vendu 3,125 GBP (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
169
Faulhaber, Johann (1580-1635)
NEWERFUNDNER GEBRAUCH EINES NIDERLÄNDISCHEN INSTRUMENTS ZUM ABMESSEN UND GRUNDLEGEN MIT SEHR GESCHWINDEM VORTHEIL ZU PRACTICIERN. AUGSBURG: DAVID FRANCK, 1610
Estimation
2 5003 000
Lot. Vendu 3,125 GBP (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

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Faulhaber, Johann (1580-1635)
NEWERFUNDNER GEBRAUCH EINES NIDERLÄNDISCHEN INSTRUMENTS ZUM ABMESSEN UND GRUNDLEGEN MIT SEHR GESCHWINDEM VORTHEIL ZU PRACTICIERN. AUGSBURG: DAVID FRANCK, 1610
FIRST EDITION, small 4to (190 x 135mm.), last leaf blank, engraved folding plate, modern marbled boards, new endpapers, modern folding cloth box, minor spotting
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Provenance

bought from Jonathan Hill, New York, 1983

Bibliographie

Tomash & Williams F23; VD17 23:334852G (title reading: "dort Modisten/ [et]c. daselbsten"); cf. VD17 12:155092W (title reading: dort "Modisten/ [et]c.")

Description

Johannes Faulhaber taught mathematics in Ulm, and was the author of some twenty-seven works on mathematical, technical and occult subjects.

"The publication of this work got Faulhaber into difficulty with the authorities, yet again, because he published it without the permission of those responsible for the supervision of schools. It has been described as a work on the sector, but this is an error, perhaps due to the fact that it is often found bound with his work on the sector (see lot 170). It is only three and a half pages of text with a folding plate showing a semicircular instrument divided into 220 parts. The device was invented in the Netherlands by Daniel Speckle and was evidently intended for use by surveyors" (Tomash & Williams).

The colophon reads: "Geben in Ulm den 27 December/ Anno 1609".

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

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Londres