157
157
A Rare Decorated Ketubbah from Bayonne, France, 1750
Estimation
6 0008 000
Lot. Vendu 7,500 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
157
A Rare Decorated Ketubbah from Bayonne, France, 1750
Estimation
6 0008 000
Lot. Vendu 7,500 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Judaica, including a Distinguished Private Collection

|
New York

A Rare Decorated Ketubbah from Bayonne, France, 1750
Ink and gouache on parchment (14 7/8 x 12 1/8 in.; 378 x 309 mm); written in Sephardic square (three initial words) and semi-cursive (balance) scripts in dark brown ink on twenty-one long lines; ruled in blind; justification via dilation of final letters; signatures below. Multicolor floral motifs framing central text panel; enlarged, decorated initial words; first two set in painted red cartouche; small portion of original ribbon still affixed to the document. Slight scattered staining; minor cockling; some ink and gouache chipped; a few small losses to outer edges of parchment.
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Description

Celebrating the wedding of Joseph ben Jacob Lopes Salzedo and Rebecca bat Jacob Gomes Fonsèque in Bayonne on Wednesday, 4 Kislev 5511 (November 21, 1750).

Witnesses: Jacob Attias and Daniel Alvares Pereira (d. 1782).

This rare ketubbah commemorates a wedding held in the small but prominent Jewish community of Bayonne, located in southwestern France. The community was founded by converso Jews who fled from the Inquisition early in the sixteenth century but were not officially permitted to practice their Judaism openly until 1723. Only ten decorated ketubbot created in Bayonne before 1800 are known, and the present document is the fourth oldest.

The artistic design of this ketubbah reflects that found in other decorated marriage contracts from France: floral motifs and diverse artistic patterns were emphasized, while depictions of human figures were avoided. These contracts were created by Jewish folk artists who also produced a variety of other illustrated manuscripts for their communities, such as Esther scrolls and Passover Haggadot.

Literature

Henry Léon, Histoire des Juifs de Bayonne (Paris: Armand Durlacher, 1893), 363-364, 402.

Important Judaica, including a Distinguished Private Collection

|
New York