152
152
Two Mughal brocade jama, North India, probably 18th century
Estimation
3 0005 000
Lot. Vendu 6,250 GBP (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
152
Two Mughal brocade jama, North India, probably 18th century
Estimation
3 0005 000
Lot. Vendu 6,250 GBP (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Recollections of Places Past, Property from the Estate of Sir John and Lady Smith

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Londres

Two Mughal brocade jama, North India, probably 18th century
the first in gilt metal thread brocade with an overall design of Persian style rose bushes, original red and gold striped lining with sky blue silk binding, small tear on right shoulder and repaired split in right hand rear panel of skirt, brocade otherwise in very good condition; the second in ivory silk satin with an overall pattern of small brocade ‘tiger stripes’ in gilt metal thread and crimson silk, original red and gold striped lining and red silk binding, small hole in lining, brocade generally in very good condition; together with a red herringbone twill silk sash with gilt metal thread brocaded ends (3)
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Provenance

Possibly Henry Vansittart (1732–1770) when Governor of Bengal from 1759 to 1764 or his brother;
George Vansittart (1745-1825) when in Bengal from 1761 to 1776;
thence by descent

Description

The jama was part of the typical Mughal court costume for men and refers to a full-skirted coat with a crossover bodice tied under the arm with fabric cords. The Emperor Akbar is reputed to have introduced the convention of Muslims tying their coats under their right arm and Hindus tying theirs under the left. The style and design of jama evolved with time, but despite small changes in its cut or length, it remained one of the most iconic pieces of clothing of the Mughal period (for additional information on the jamas of Mughal India and their evolution please refer to the article published by Toolika Gupta on the website: https://www.sahapedia.org/the-jamas-of-mughal-india). These two metal thread brocade tunics are a rare survival of the Mughal silk atelier of the eighteenth century; each of them is decorated with gilt metal thread interwoven with coloured silk. The Persian style rose bushes on the first jama are a decorative motif widely found in Mughal textiles, from carpets to shawls and velvets (similar brocade with this pattern are now in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, inv.no.IS.788-1883 and inv.no.IS.9625&A and inv.no.IS.132-1883). More unusual is the pattern on the second jama, where the ivory silk satin is decorated with small brocade ‘tiger stripes’, a motif originally from China, which travelled throughout all Asia and was largely used especially by the Ottoman.
 

Recollections of Places Past, Property from the Estate of Sir John and Lady Smith

|
Londres