128
128
A George III silver nine-basket epergne, Thomas Pitts, London, 1778
ACCÉDER AU LOT
128
A George III silver nine-basket epergne, Thomas Pitts, London, 1778
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Neil & Gina Smith Collection

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Londres

A George III silver nine-basket epergne, Thomas Pitts, London, 1778
complete with one large lobed oval basket with beaded lip (engraved on one side with a crest), four smaller oval baskets and four circular baskets, similar, all detachable, also eight detachable foliate branches, the frame on four supports with a central urn and applied festoons and urns in ovals, the borders of chased anthemion scrolls or pierced matted circles connected by flowerheads
41cm., 16 1/8in. high; 54.5cm., 21 1/2in. wide
3660gr., 117oz. 13dwt
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Provenance

S.J. Shrubsole, New York, 29 March 2000

Description

For a very similar epergne, Thomas Pitts, London, 1777, see Robert Rowe, Adam Silver, London, 1965, p. 37B; and another, London, 1779, the maker's mark of Thomas Pitts misidentified as that of Thomas Powell, was sold at Sotheby's, London, 23 April 1970, lot 205.

Thomas Pitts, who was probably born in the early 1720s was apprenticed to Charles Hatfield on 6 December 1737 before being turned over to David Willaume the younger in February 1742 to complete his training. Within the next two decades he was well established, with premises and a factory in Air Street, Piccadilly from where he advertised as a ‘WORKING SILVER-SMITH and CHASER . . . Makes & Sells all Sorts of large & small Plate, in the newest Taste . . .’ (trade card, circa 1760, Heal Collection, British Museum) He specialised, although not exclusively so, in the manufacture of epergnes, supplying many to the retail goldsmiths, Parker & Wakelin (successors to George Wickes, et al.) of Panton Street, Haymarket. For comment, see Helen Clifford, Silver in London, The Parker and Wakelin Partnership 1760-1776, Yale University Press, 2004, pp. 93-95. Pitts died on 12 December 1795 and was survived by his wife, Mary, three sons, Thomas, William and Joseph and four granddaughters, Harriett, Sarah Elizabeth, Margaret and Maria, by his son, Thomas and his late wife, Harriett. His will, signed on 6 August 1792, was proved In the Consistory Court of London on 16 December 1795 by his executors, his widow and son, Joseph. (London Metropolitan Archives, CL/C/433, no. 209)

The Neil & Gina Smith Collection

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Londres