117
117
A GOLD-SPLASH BRONZE ALMS-BOWL CENSER
MING / EARLY QING DYNASTY
Estimation
280 000350 000
Lot. Vendu 812,500 HKD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
117
A GOLD-SPLASH BRONZE ALMS-BOWL CENSER
MING / EARLY QING DYNASTY
Estimation
280 000350 000
Lot. Vendu 812,500 HKD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Water, Pine and Stone Retreat Collection, Scholarly Art III

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Hong Kong

A GOLD-SPLASH BRONZE ALMS-BOWL CENSER
MING / EARLY QING DYNASTY
the globular body with rounded shoulders below an incurved lipped mouth, the exterior decorated with random gold splashes, the flat base inscribed in gilt with two characters reading bao yong (‘for treasured use’) in seal script
10.5 cm., 4 1/8  in.
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Exposition

Gerard Tsang and Hugh Moss, Arts from the Scholar’s Studio, Fung Ping Shan Museum, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 1986, cat. no. 229.

Description

The present gold-splashed vessel is notable for its form, after Buddhist alms bowls, and for the extremely rare inscription on the base which reads bao yong that translates as ‘for treasured use’. Among later bronzes, alms bowls were converted into incense burners for the scholar’s studio, although they are generally larger than the present example and are more commonly found with two ring handles on the body. This is a smaller and more elegant version of the type, with the two gold characters on the base skilfully designed to match the random appearance of the splashing.

A gold-splashed bowl with a Xuande six-character reign mark, from the National Palace Museum, Taipei, was included in the exhibition Guan cang yadiao ji Ming, Qing tonglu tezhan / Special Exhibition of Ivory Carvings and Ming and Qing Incense Burners from the Museum's Collection, Kumamoto City Museum, Kumamoto, 1997, cat. no. 178, which may have served as inspiration for the present example. See also a bowl sold in these rooms, 15th May 1990, lot 353; a slightly larger example sold in our London rooms, 13th July 2005, lot 191; and a plain bronze bowl of this type, attributed to the Ming dynasty, published in The Second Bronze Age. Later Chinese Metalwork, London, 1991, pl. 45, where the present piece is mentioned as a comparable example.

Water, Pine and Stone Retreat Collection, Scholarly Art III

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Hong Kong