102
102
The extremely rare Henry VII apostle spoon from the collection of Sir Arthur Evans, discoverer of the Palace of Knossos, maker's mark a lamb (Jackson's), London, 1507
ACCÉDER AU LOT
102
The extremely rare Henry VII apostle spoon from the collection of Sir Arthur Evans, discoverer of the Palace of Knossos, maker's mark a lamb (Jackson's), London, 1507
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Neil & Gina Smith Collection

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The extremely rare Henry VII apostle spoon from the collection of Sir Arthur Evans, discoverer of the Palace of Knossos, maker's mark a lamb (Jackson's), London, 1507
the gilt terminal cast as St. James the Less, beaded nimbus, fig-shaped bowl, the bowl back pricked with the initials SH above an emblem (apparently + and P, perhaps intended to be a Monogrammatic Cross)
18cm., 7in. long
50gr., 1oz. 10dwt.
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Provenance

Sir Arthur Evans (1851-1941), archaeologist, discoverer of the Palace of Knossos, Crete and sometime President of the Society of Antiquaries of London, sold Sotheby’s, London, 30 May 1935, lot 102 (£140)
The late Col. Robert Frederick Ratcliff (1867-1943) of Newton Park, Burton-on-Trent, brewer, Territorial Army officer and sometime M.P. for Burton-on-Trent, sold Christie’s, London, 9 June 1943 (£340)
The Cookson Collection (Gerald Hugh Cookson, 1925-2000) by 1953
From a Collection of Early Silver Spoons, Woolley & Wallis Salisbury, 25 October 2000, lot 37

Bibliographie

The Illustrated London News, London, Saturday, 19 June 1943, p. 690, illustrated
Commander George Evelyn Paget How in collaboration with Jane Prentice How, English and Scottish Silver Spoons, London, 1953, vol. II, p. 76, ch. III, section II, pl. 15

Description

In their commentary, Commander and Mrs. How describe this as a 'very fine spoon,' showing 'all the characteristics of bowl, stem and pediment that one would expect in the early sixteenth century.' They make particular reference to the 'beautifully modelled Apostle, with the well-formed emblem.' 'The nimbus,' they continue, 'is most unusual being engraved on the lower surface to represent Rays of Glory whilst the upper surface is beaded.' (Commander George Evelyn Paget How in collaboration with Jane Prentice How, English and Scottish Silver Spoons, London, 1953, vol. II, p. 76, ch. III, section II, pl. 15)

When this spoon was sold from the collection of Sir Arthur Evans at Sotheby's on 30 May 1935 (lot 102), the previous lot was another 1507 London-made Apostle spoon (called St. James the Greater but later recognised by Commander and Mrs. How as St. Jude). Although not from the same set, both spoons had clearly been together since at least the 17th century because the backs of the bowls were similarly pricked with the same initials and the + and P emblem. This St. Jude spoon, bearing the maker's mark, a branch or tree, is now in the Assheton-Bennett Collection, City Art Gallery, Manchester. (See How, English and Scottish Silver Spoons, London, 1953, vol. II, p. 74, ch. III, section II, pl. 14) 

The Neil & Gina Smith Collection

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Londres