51
51
Bartoli, Cosimo (1503-1572)
DEL MODO DI MISURARE LE DISTANTIE, LE SUPERFICIE, I CORPI, LE PIANTE, LE PROVINCIE, LE PROSPETTIVE, & TUTTE LE ALTRE COSE TERRENE, CHE POSSONO OCCORRERE A GLI HUOMINI, SECONDO LE VERE REGOLE D'EUCLIDE, & DE GLI ALTRI PIU LODATI SCRITTORI. VENICE: FRANCESCO DE' FRANCESCHI, 1564
Estimation
8001 000
ACCÉDER AU LOT
51
Bartoli, Cosimo (1503-1572)
DEL MODO DI MISURARE LE DISTANTIE, LE SUPERFICIE, I CORPI, LE PIANTE, LE PROVINCIE, LE PROSPETTIVE, & TUTTE LE ALTRE COSE TERRENE, CHE POSSONO OCCORRERE A GLI HUOMINI, SECONDO LE VERE REGOLE D'EUCLIDE, & DE GLI ALTRI PIU LODATI SCRITTORI. VENICE: FRANCESCO DE' FRANCESCHI, 1564
Estimation
8001 000
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
Londres

Bartoli, Cosimo (1503-1572)
DEL MODO DI MISURARE LE DISTANTIE, LE SUPERFICIE, I CORPI, LE PIANTE, LE PROVINCIE, LE PROSPETTIVE, & TUTTE LE ALTRE COSE TERRENE, CHE POSSONO OCCORRERE A GLI HUOMINI, SECONDO LE VERE REGOLE D'EUCLIDE, & DE GLI ALTRI PIU LODATI SCRITTORI. VENICE: FRANCESCO DE' FRANCESCHI, 1564
FIRST EDITION, 4to (225 x 170mm.), elaborate woodcut border on title-page, woodcut portrait of the author, woodcut initials and headpieces, woodcut diagrams, 2 folding woodcut plates, signature M in duplicate, contemporary vellum, ties, last leaf holed affecting a few letters
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Provenance

bought from Jonathan Hill, New York, 1979

Bibliographie

Tomash & Williams B109; Edit16 4299; Mortimer, Harvard Italian 45; Riccardi i, 90; USTC 812411

Description

“This well-known volume actually comprises six books, covering everything a surveyor should know about a variety of instruments. It begins with simple illustrations of the use of Jacob’s Staff and a quadrant with shadow scales and progresses to the use of more complex instruments in a wide variety of applications. The second and third books cover practical applications of plane and solid geometry such as finding areas and volumes of irregular figures. Book 4 deals with cartography and is notable for a description of the use of the device called a circumferentor – an instrument combining a compass and a sighting device for determining angles of elevation. Book 5 contains various proofs of geometric propositions that might be of use to a surveyor. The final book is a discussion of how to find square roots and a table of squares for all integers from 1 to 661” (Tomash & Williams)

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
Londres