205
205

PROPERTY OF AN ENGLISH PRIVATE COLLECTION

English School, circa 1750
VIEWS OF THE RIVER THAMES AT BATTERSEA AND PUTNEY
Estimation
30 00050 000
ACCÉDER AU LOT
205

PROPERTY OF AN ENGLISH PRIVATE COLLECTION

English School, circa 1750
VIEWS OF THE RIVER THAMES AT BATTERSEA AND PUTNEY
Estimation
30 00050 000
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Old Masters Day Sale

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English School, circa 1750
VIEWS OF THE RIVER THAMES AT BATTERSEA AND PUTNEY
Quantité: 2
a pair, both oil on canvas
each: 48.7 x 92 cm.; 19 1/2  x 36 1/4  in.
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Provenance

Possibly with Knoedler, London, 1928;
With Gooden & Fox, London;
Anonymous sale, London, Sotheby's, 11 July 1990, lot 71.

Description

The view taken from near Battersea Church looking down the river towards Chelsea is based on an engraving by J. Boydell dated 1752, for which he also executed the drawing. Looking from the left, it shows Milman Street, Lindsey House and Beauford Street, all in Chelsea, with the church (now known as Chelsea Old Church) centre left, and Cheyne Walk behind the trees. On the south side of the river is shown Lord Bolingbroke's house, in which he died the year before the engraving, with St. Mary's Battersea, which was mentioned in the Domesday Book, in the foreground. The church was rebuilt in 1777.

The view looking up the river from Putney Bridge is also based on a Boydell engraving, this time of 1749. Another version is in the Museum of London: only the boats differ in the two scenes.1 On the left, the view shows the small village of Putney, already famous for its villas and orchards, with the 15th century tower of St. Mary's Church. This was rebuilt in 1836, with the original tower retained, but gutted by fire in 1973. A fragment of the first Putney Bridge, which connected Putney and Fulham, is to be seen on the extreme left. The wooden bridge, built in 1729 by Thomas Phillips, carpenter to George II, was the only one above London Bridge until the opening of Westminster Bridge in 1750, and therefore gave its proprietors a good income from its tolls until this date. It was replaced by a stone bridge in 1882–86.

1 See M. Galinou & J. Hayes, London in Paint, Oil paintings in the Collection at the Museum of London, London 1996, p. 78, cat. no. 24, reproduced.

Old Masters Day Sale

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