132
132

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF JAN KRUGIER

Paul Klee
STILLEBEN MIT ZERBROCHENEM SPIEGEL (STILL LIFE WITH BROKEN MIRROR)
Estimation
70 000100 000
Lot. Vendu 112,500 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
132

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF JAN KRUGIER

Paul Klee
STILLEBEN MIT ZERBROCHENEM SPIEGEL (STILL LIFE WITH BROKEN MIRROR)
Estimation
70 000100 000
Lot. Vendu 112,500 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York

Paul Klee
1879 - 1940
STILLEBEN MIT ZERBROCHENEM SPIEGEL (STILL LIFE WITH BROKEN MIRROR)
Signed Klee (upper right); dated 1932, numbered U10 and titled (on the artist's mount)
Brush and ink and ink wash on paper mounted on card
Sheet: 8 1/4 by 18 7/8 in.; 21 by 48 cm
Mount: 15 3/8 by 25 1/8 in.; 39 by 63.8 cm
Executed in 1932.
Lire le rapport d'état Lire le rapport d'état

We are grateful to Stefan Frey, Bern, for his kind assistance in cataloguing this lot.

Provenance

Lily Klee, Bern (by descent from the artist in 1940)
Klee-Gesellschaft, Bern (acquired from the above in 1946)
Rolf & Catherine E. Bürgi, Bern (acquired from the above in 1950)
Nachlass Rolf Bürgi, Bern (by descent from the above in 1967)
Galerie Beyeler, Basel (acquired from the above in 1969)
Peter Wurmser, Switzerland (acquired from the above in 1982)
Galerie Römer, Zurich (acquired from the above in 1988)
David Neumann, Stockholm (by 1995)
Private Collection, Sweden (acquired by 1998 and sold: Christie's, London, February 10, 2005, lot 657)
Acquired at the above sale

Exposition

Basel, Galerie Beyeler, Klee-Kunst ist ein Schöpfungsgleichnis, 1973, no. 61, illustrated in the catalogue
Paris, Galerie Karl Flinker, Klee, 74 oeuvres de 1908 à 1940, 1974, no. 50
Dusseldorf, W. Wittrock Kunsthandel, Paul Klee, 1977, n.n., illustrated in the catalogue
Basel, Galerie Beyeler, Stillben im 20. Jahrhundert, 1978-79, no. 41
Cologne, Kunsthalle, Paul Klee, Das Werk der Jahre 1919-1933, Gemälde, Handzeichnungen, Druckgraphik, 1979, no. 353
Charleroi, Palais des Beaux-Art, Panorama de l'oeuvre de Paul Klee, 1980, no. 80
Stockholm, National Musuem, Still leben, 1995, no. 240, illustrated in color in the catalogue p. 150
New York, Richard L. Feigen & Co. & New York, Jan Krugier Gallery, The Third Eye: Fantasies, Dreams and Visions, 2005-06, n.n.

Bibliographie

The Paul Klee Foundation & Museum of Fine Arts, Bern, eds., Paul Klee Catalogue Raisonné 1931-1933, vol. VI, Bern, 2002, no. 5906, illustrated p. 256

Description

The present work was executed immediately following Klee's retirement from his role as an instructor at the Bauhaus, the seminal school of architecture and industrial arts. The tonal layering and the imaginative figural abstraction present here exemplify the unique iconography found in Klee's strongest works on paper. The composition relates to a group of works that Klee commenced in the summer of 1929, experimenting with superimposed or interlocking planes. As Will Grohmann writes, “The problem of space occupied Klee much more insistently in 1929. After many experiments Klee wrote in April 1930 of his hope that ‘what I have achieved in the three dimensional realm’ would become lastingly fruitful for his work. He was not alluding to the perspective or illusionistic space but to the ‘flow’ of space; ‘the goal is inward, the problem mysterious,’ he said” (Will Grohmann, Klee, New York, 1958, p. 281).

At the heart of Klee’s distinct and methodical approach was his belief that his art was a manifestation of his inner-most self. His boundless imagination and vivacious compositions became the basis for his reputation as one of the great intellectual painters of the twentieth century. According to Andrew Kagan, “Klee’s greatness as a colorist and his gifts as a draftsman embrace a truly extraordinary range and diversity. His seemingly tireless experimentation and his astounding inventiveness are among his distinctive characteristics, but they make his mature work rather difficult to grasp and understand in its entirety. Klee may seem to be everywhere at once, with the most random approaches. It must be understood that his ultimate ambitions embraced the concept of an art that would resolve all apparent contradiction, an art that would reconcile all dualities and oppositions—in other words, an art of ultimate synthesis. ‘Truth,’ he declared, ‘demands that all elements be present at once’” (Paul Klee at the Guggenheim Museum (exhibition catalogue), Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1993, pp. 26-27).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York