101
101

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE TEXAS COLLECTION

A VERY RARE BRONZE RITUAL WINE VESSEL (JIA)
LATE SHANG DYNASTY,
13TH-11TH CENTURY BC
Estimation
80 000120 000
Lot. Vendu 209,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
101

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE TEXAS COLLECTION

A VERY RARE BRONZE RITUAL WINE VESSEL (JIA)
LATE SHANG DYNASTY,
13TH-11TH CENTURY BC
Estimation
80 000120 000
Lot. Vendu 209,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art

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New York

A VERY RARE BRONZE RITUAL WINE VESSEL (JIA)
LATE SHANG DYNASTY,
13TH-11TH CENTURY BC
the deep rounded body resting on three blade-like legs, finely cast around the sides with three taotie masks with prominent eyes, open jaws exposing hooked fangs and C-shaped horns, flanked by a pair of descending kui dragons, each centered on a plain shallow flange repeated above the narrow band of confronted dragons, the gently flared lip decorated with upright blades filled with cicadas, set with two posts surmounted by a pair of large waisted finials, each cast with blades and interlocked 'T'-scroll border and with sunken whorl-pattern on top, with a strap handle on one side, a single pictogram cast in the center of the interior, reading ding
Height 11 7/8  in., 30.2 cm
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Provenance

Collection of David H. H. Feliz.
Christie's New York, 2nd December 1989, lot 28.
Sotheby's New York, 22nd March 2001, lot 3.

Description

The Jia is among the first four bronze vessel types to appear in China’s Bronze Age. It continued to play a central role in ritual ceremonies until the middle Western Zhou dynasty. Jia vessels of the present type are typical of the early phase of the Anyang period, circa 13th century BC.  A very similar jia vessel excavated in 1959 at Wuguan village, Anyang city, is discussed and illustrated in Excavation of Yinxu 1958-1961, Beijing, 1987, p. 240, pl. 58. Another similar jia with an inscription reading mu ya, unearthed from Henan province and now in the Henan Provincial Museum, is discussed and illustrated in the Zhongguo wenwu jinghua dacidian: qingtong juan, (The Grand Dictionary of Gems of Chinese Cultural Relics: Bronzes), Shanghai, 1995, p. 53, no. 185.

The pictogram, which shows a tripod food vessel ding, is a clan sign that can also been seen on other bronze vessels, such as the ding in the Tenri Sankokan, Nara; a fangyi in Shanghai, and a zun and two you in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; see Noel Barnard and Cheung Kwong-yue, Rubbings and Hand Copies of Bronze Inscriptions in Chinese, Japanese, European, American, and Australasian Collections, Taipei, 1978, vol. 8, nos. 1610-1613.

Fine Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art

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New York