147
147
AN INSCRIBED BAMBOO BRUSHPOT
CALLIGRAPHY BY LI YOUCHEN
QING DYNASTY, 19TH CENTURY, DATED TO 1867
Estimation
140 000180 000
Lot. Vendu 200,000 HKD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
147
AN INSCRIBED BAMBOO BRUSHPOT
CALLIGRAPHY BY LI YOUCHEN
QING DYNASTY, 19TH CENTURY, DATED TO 1867
Estimation
140 000180 000
Lot. Vendu 200,000 HKD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Water, Pine and Stone Retreat Collection, Scholarly Art III

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Hong Kong

AN INSCRIBED BAMBOO BRUSHPOT
CALLIGRAPHY BY LI YOUCHEN
QING DYNASTY, 19TH CENTURY, DATED TO 1867
of cylindrical form with a slightly bulging base raised on three low feet, the exterior incised in running script with a poem by the Tang dynasty poet Wang Wei on mountain scenery in autumn, followed by the date dingmao dongri ('A winter day of dingmao year', corresponding to 1867), signed Qingxi Sanren shu ('Inscribed by Qingxi Sanren'), the bamboo patinated to an attractive golden-brown colour
10.9 cm., 4 1/4  in.
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Provenance

Christie’s Hong Kong, 28th November 2005, lot 1479.

Description

The present finely carved brushpot bears the signature of Li Zengzuo, more commonly known as Li Youchen, whose sobriquet was Qingxi sanren.  Li was a Shanghai artist, especially skilled in calligraphy, in particular the cursive and regular scripts. His name appears in the Shanghai newspaper Shenbao in 1879 and 1880 and in Shibao in 1907, for he was one of the many artists who marketed their works for disaster-relief causes.

The inscription is adapted from Wang Wei’s (699-759) poem titled Shan Ju Qiu Ming ('My Mountain Villa in an Autumn Evening') and may be translated as follows:

          In the empty hills, after a fresh rain,
          The air turns autumnal with the evening.
          The bright moon shines amid the pines;
          The clear fountain flows upon the stones.
          Noise from the bamboos—washer girls come home;
          Movement in the lotuses—fisher boats drift down.
          Who would have thought spring’s perfumes would wane?
          But the Prince may tarry here.

Another bamboo brushpot inscribed with the same signature Qingxi shanren, from the collection of Dr. Ip Yee, is illustrated in Ip Yee and Laurence C. S. Tam, Chinese Bamboo Carving, Hong Kong, 1978 and 1982, part 1, pl. 79.

Water, Pine and Stone Retreat Collection, Scholarly Art III

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Hong Kong