272
272
Bell, Alexander Graham
Estimation
4 0006 000
Lot. Vendu 3,438 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
272
Bell, Alexander Graham
Estimation
4 0006 000
Lot. Vendu 3,438 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

THE JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: ARTS & SCIENCES, INCLUDING THE MARK TWAIN COLLECTION

|
New York

Bell, Alexander Graham

Letter signed ("Alexander Graham Bell") with autograph postscript, 14 pages on four lined bifolia (9 1/4 x 5 3/4 in.; 235 x 145 mm) with letterhead "Scott Circle, Washington DC", 28 January 1883, to Thomas Sanders; inside of each bifolium silked. Red half-morocco drop-box, gilt-stamped black leather title label on spine, transcription laid in.

With:
Autograph letter signed ("Alexander Graham Bell"), 1 page (8 x 5 in.; 203 x 128 mm), Washington, D.C., 12 February 1893, to Mrs. George T. Sanders, congratulating her on the birth of her daughter; ink has run slightly affecting legibility. Red half-morocco clam-shell box, gilt-stamped title label on spine.


Lire le rapport d'état Lire le rapport d'état

Description

Superb long and detailed letter to the man who financed his telephone experiments, about the ongoing education of his deaf son and new ideas Bell had for educating deaf children, twice mentioning Dr. [E.M.] Gallaudet.

It was Bell's original work in speech that led him to the invention of the telephone, and George Sanders was one of his first pupils. He taught George from 1873 to 1876 in the house of his grandmother, and it was in the grandmother's house that Bell conducted the experiments that led to the invention of the telephone. Thomas Sanders, a wealthy businessman, in gratitude, financed Bell's telephone experiments  and when the Bell Telephone Company was established, he became its treasurer. In the letter, Bell reports on new plans for George's education: "I cannot tell you what pleasure your note of the 21st has given me. Previous to its reception I was afraid to make any definite arrangements for George ... upon the receipt of your letter I invited Mr. Wilson, Supt. of Public Schools of Washington to dine with me ... I succeeded in arousing his interest in my scheme for the education of deaf children in contact with hearing children."

Bell goes on to report of his efforts to find a male teacher for George and enlisting the advice of Dr. Gallaudet. : "He [Wilson] had consulted with one of their best teachers, Mr. Cram ... [who] has charge of a class of boys, about 40 in number, in the Franklin School, the ages varying from 14 to 16 ... I visited Mr. Crams's school-room and was much delighted not only with him but with the boys in his class ... Mr. Cram has a very clear and distinct utterance and a sympathetic manner. Altogether I feel that our experiment is destined to be a success ..."

The second letter is witness to the success of his method, as George has gone on to lead a normal life, has married, and now has a daughter.

THE JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: ARTS & SCIENCES, INCLUDING THE MARK TWAIN COLLECTION

|
New York